Gustav Mahler

Ansicht von 15 Beiträgen - 136 bis 150 (von insgesamt 171)
  • Autor
    Beiträge
  • #4075675  | PERMALINK

    kingberzerk

    Registriert seit: 10.03.2008

    Beiträge: 2,062

    Immer ein bisschen schwer, über Autoren zu diskutieren, wenn die Inhalte nur über Rezensionen wiedergegeben werden. Erinnert mich an Diskussionen über Martin Walser. Zwar fühle ich mich weniger als Apologet Norman Lebrechts, dennoch werden die genannten Schlussfolgerungen dem Autor nicht gerecht. Ich kann’s ja mal versuchen.

    clasjazIch störe mich da an anderem. Zunächst, das Anknüpfen an Personen, sei’s Bernstein, sei’s Gorbatchov, um die Bedeutung von Mahler herauszustellen. Das ist mir zu viel Plakat.

    Zu wenig Pointierung ist nicht das Problem von Lebrecht, so viel ist klar. Allerdings weiß ich nicht, was mit dem „Anknüpfen an Personen“ gemeint ist, aber Lebrecht verwendet keine Aufzählung von Namen, um damit die Bedeutung von Mahler herauszustellen. Auch die Bedeutung Bernsteins für Mahlers Musik wird in seiner Ambivalenz herausgearbeitet. Die Tatsache, dass Bernsteins Name eng mit der Bedeutung der Rezeptionsgeschichte Mahlers verbunden ist, muss ich jetzt nicht weiter ausführen.

    Gorbatschow hat mich jetzt mal selbst interessiert. Also habe das Buch aufgeschlagen und entdecke, dass alle Anwürfe von Bernstein über Gorbatschow bis zu Samuel Johnson und das US-amerikanische Befinden gleich in den ersten drei Seiten zu finden sind. Etwas enttäuschend, wenn man sieht, dass der Zeitungs-Rezensent sich mehr oder weniger an der Einleitung abgearbeitet hat.

    Das Kapitel „Some Frequently Asked Questions“ beginnt so:

    Can Mahler change your life?

    In August 1991, Mikhail Gorbachev was meeting military officials at his holiday home in the Crimea when, resisting a demand for a return to totalitarian rule, he was placed under house arrest. The phone went dead and he was held incommunicado for three days. His wife, Raisa, collapsed with a hypertension attack. In Moscow, protesters massed in the streets and the president of the Russian republic, Boris Yeltsin, led an armed vigil outside and Gorbachev was restored to office, only to be deposed at the year’s end by the drunken and rapacious Yeltsin.

    On one of his last nights in office that December, Gorbachev and his wife went to see Claudio Abbado conduct Gustav Mahler’s Fifth Symphony, music they had not heard before. It affected them deeply. ‘I had the feeling’, wrote Gorbachev, ‘that Mahler’s music somehow touched our situation, about the struggles.’ Raisa said: ‘I’ve been shaken by his music. It left me with a feeling of despondency, a feeling that there is no way out.’ Abbado assured her that this was not Mahler’s intention, nor his own, but she was not reassured. The second most powerful couple in the world had been unsettled by something in the music that felt personal to them. ‘In life’, reflected Gorbachev in his memoirs, ‘there is always conflict and contradiction, but without those – there is no life. Mahler was able to capture that aspect of human condition.’

    Conflict and contradiction – not a bad piece of music analysis from a world leader – are the essence of Mahler’s art, but they do no account for its instantaneous impact on a politician hardened by quotidian confrontation. Something in the music had pierced his public carapace and attacked the individual unconscious. Something else was going on, and I think I know what it was. What the Gorbachevs failed to recognize was that they had been listening to Mahler unawares all their lives. Through decades of mass murder, hot and cold wars, state larceny and comic inefficiency, Communism had imposed a mould of conformity on Soviet arts, sending poets and writers to exile and death if ever they deviated from the fixed party line. Music in the Soviet Union amounted to an official, upbeat soundtrack to everyday life.

    Musicians, however, had a way of bending the line. Dmitri Shostakovich, in fifteen symphonies and fifteen string quartets, charted life under Stalin in ways his audience could understand and commissars could not prosecute. Alfred Schnittke described the stars of Soviet disintegration without getting sent to the salt mines. Both employed a device they borrowed from Gustav Mahler – the application of irony in a musical score.

    Irony, in Samuel Johnson’s definition, is ‘a mode of speed in which the meaning is contrary to the words’, a way of saying one thing and meaning another. Music, before Mahler, had a lexicon of simple emotions: joy, sorrow, love, hate, uplift, downcast, beauty, ugliness, and so on. Mahler in his First Symphony introduced the possibility of paralleled meanings: a child’s funeral broken by a delirious orgy, an apparent lament that turns absurd without losing its tragedy. Using the same duality, composers were able to buck and mock the Soviet system, outwardly a timid man, applied Mahlerian irony (among other hidden codes) in many of his works, most daringly in the Eleventh Symphony, where a Communist revolutionary ode is tauntingly laced with snippets from Mahler’s ‘Resurrection’. Alfred Schnittke developed ‘polystylism’ out of the flurry of mixed messages in Mahler’s First Symphony. Mahler, through the ingenuity of Soviet musicians, became a subversive undercurrent, scarcely performed by state orchestras but pervasive as vodka in the national bloodstream. The Fifth symphony sounded to the Gorbachevs like everyday music, but with a ominous twist.

    Even as he was infusing Russia with dissident freedoms, Mahler, on the far side of the Cold War, was feeding two tracks of the American mind as the official sound of public mourning and the commercial backdrop to popular amusement. A week after John F. Kennedy’s assassination, Leonard Bernstein conducted Mahler’s Second Symphony in memoriam; at the funeral of his brother Robert, he performed the Adagietto from the Fifth Symphony. After the terror attacks of 11 September 2001, many US orchestras and radio stations switched to Mahler. ‘The songs and symphonies of Gustav Mahler prophetically mourn the victims of twentieth-century catastrophes’, noted one American composer. Along with Samuel Barber’s Adagio, itself a Mahlerian imitation, Mahler’s Second and Ninth Symphonies were America’s music of lamentation.

    The same music, at the same time, was also its engine of mass entertainment. In Hollywood, composers Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Max Steiner, Franz Waxman and Alfred Newman found in Mahler a sonic underpinning for epic movies, a dialect that extends from Korngold’s Errol Flynn swashbucklers to John William’s score for Star Wars. When Harry Potter mounts his broomstick, the lift-off takes its thrust from Mahler’s ‘Resurrection’. Of twenty-five ‘greatest’ film scores listed by the American Film Institute, more than half are by Mahler-influenced composers. Mahler can be heard in the rock music of the Grateful Dead, Pink Floyd, King Crimson, Blue Nile and John Zorn. His music crosses all cultural and ideological barriers.

    This universality is not easily explained. Mahler is accused of emotional indulgence, yet his music affects dark-suited audiences in Japan as much as open-shirted Mediterranean crowds. He can sound derivative, yet he is extensively imitated. Schoenberg and Stravinsky may have been bolder, Strauss and Puccini more melodic, but Mahler is the most widely performed. None of his symphonies is short or simple. He took the form to extremes of gloom (Sixth), size (Eighth) and quietude (Ninth), and his meaning is often wilfully perverse. ‘Whatever quality is perceptible and definably in Mahler’s music’, said Bernstein, ‘the diametrically opposite is equally so.’ The Adagietto of the Fifth Symphony, played at funerals, was written as a love letter – another instance of Mahler writing music that points in opposite ways.

    The paradoxes pile up. He expressed intimate, furtive, even shameful feelings in pages that were written for a hundred players and an audience of thousands. This contrast of message and medium is innate: it may also lead us towards the secret of Mahler’s intensive appeal. Mass society overwhelms the individual in us with the encroachments of ephemeral fashion. Mahler turns that formula on its head, using orchestral mass to liberate the individual unconscious. Among three thousand people in a concert hall you are always alone when Mahler is played.

    (…)

    Norman Lebrecht, „Why Mahler? – How One Man and Ten Symphonies Changed the World“
    Faber & Faber, London 2010. p. 3-6

    Zur Einleitung: Es ist, wie ich finde, ein gangbarer Weg, ein Buch zu beginnen. Ob man es mag oder nicht ist eine Frage des Geschmacksurteils, für die Zulässigkeit hingegen reicht die Frage nach der Legitimation. Da Lebrecht mit seinem Buch die Bedeutung Mahlers schildern möchte und sogar im Untertitel darauf hinweist, kann er doch ganz gut so beginnen. Zudem ist es glücklicherweise keine Arbeit, die akademischen Regeln folgen muss außer jener, dass Tatsachenbehauptungen stimmen sollten („Der Spiegel“ hat eine Dokumentationsabteilung dafür, Professoren nutzen dafür ihre Doktoranden, Redakteure ihre Praktikanten).

    Beim Lesen fand ich die essayistische Einleitung interessant, weil sie gleich zu Beginn Aspekte anstößt, die das Buch später konkretisieren kann. Ich fand sie jetzt nicht sonderlich bewusstseinserweiternd, gestört hat mich das Essayistische aber nicht. Im Allgemeinen wird dem narrativen Element im Angelsächsischen ohnehin mehr Bedeutung eingeräumt als hierzulande, wo man auch gern im akademischen Bereich entweder Besen verschluckt oder so tun muss, als habe man einen verschluckt.

    clasjazDann die billige Referenz auf Johnson zur Ironie, das untergräbt ja beinahe jedes Nachdenken darüber, was in der Musik überhaupt Ironie sein könne (abgesehen davon, dass Johnson da einfach die Alten zitiert).

    Da verstehe ich die Vehemenz nicht. Billiges kann ich in den oben zitierten Sätzen, die das Ironische aufgreifen, nicht entdecken, und am Thema Ironie in der Musik sind schon viele gescheitert, so wie am Thema Ironie generell. Meine These zum Beispiel ist, dass das Stilmittel der ironischen Brechung in Mahlers Schaffen nicht sonderlich gut altert, so wie auch andere seiner Stilmittel erstaunlich schnell veraltet klingen, gerade in der IV. Symphonie.

    clasjazWas mich weiter irritiert, ist diese Einheimsung Mahlers für die Klagen der Amerikaner. Da kenne ich mich sicher viel zu wenig aus, also in der amerikanischen Gemütslage, wenn es sie gibt, ich hoffe nicht; sie interessiert mich auch nicht sehr, wenn ich lese, dass Bernstein, das „Adagietto“ zum Tod von Robert Kennedy gespielt hat.

    Das ist fast schon kindisch. Aber ob nun USA oder Österreich: das Missverständnis dieses Satzes aus der Fünften ist ja gerade die Aufhebung der Ironie, das zünglerische Sich-Hingeben an schöne Töne. So ungefähr erscheint mir Lebrecht, dass er sich selbst lieber Publizist nennen würde, passt. Mir ist das zu populär, zu rauschend.

    Nun hatte Norman Lebrecht ja keinen Einfluss darauf, was anlässlich der Trauer für die Kennedy-Brüder gespielt wurde. Wohl hingegen Leonard Bernstein, wie ich vermute. Bernstein allerdings vorzuwerfen, er habe die Bedeutung des Adagiettos hinsichtlich ironischer Brechung oder nicht-ironischer Brechung nicht verstanden, wäre sicher interessanter Gesprächsstoff mit Bernstein selbst geworden, der sich zumindest beim Schleswig-Holstein-Musikfestival auf Schloss Salzau an sonnigen Nachmittagen auf dem Rasen sitzend gern mit jedem über alles unterhalten hat, wenn er es anregend fand.

    Allgemein ist es nicht unüblich, Musik zu Anlässen wie Trauer oder Freude zu spielen, hinsichtlich des Geschmacks und der Angemessenheit indes verliert man sich da schnell ins Apodiktische, wie ich finde. Karajan ließ in Salzburg vor der Probe den Beginn der Alpensinfonie von Richard Strauss anstimmen, weil in der Nacht ein Orchesterwart verstorben war. Soll man sich jetzt darüber unterhalten, ob das angemessen ist? Simon Rattle hatte bei der Aufführung der II. Symphonie Gustav Mahlers Arnold Schönbergs „Ein Überlebender aus Warschau“ vorangestellt und ließ die beiden Werke fast ohne Pause ineinander übergehen. Musikdramaturgen können da lange drüber reden, ob das gut zusammenpasst oder nicht. Berliner Kritiker erwähnten dieses Ereignis und gerieten etwas ins Straucheln, als es nun darum ging, ob und vor allem warum dies eine gute Idee war. Aber man kann es auch einfach so hinnehmen, wie ich finde.

    Lebrecht hat das in der oben zitierten Passage doch ganz gut beschrieben, Bernsteins Aphorismus, nicht nur das Herausgearbeitete, sondern auch dessen Gegenteil spiele eine Rolle, hat aus meiner Sicht als Einwurf Relevanz. Vielleicht ist die Wertschätzung einer angelegentlichen Leichtigkeit im Umgang mit diesen Fragen genau das, was mich auf Distanz zu den Ausführungen Adornos hält, der ja auch nur wie alle anderen im Dunkeln tappen konnte, wenn es um die Beschreibung der Bedeutung Mahlerscher Musik geht.

    Zu King Crimson und Grateful Dead:

    clasjazIch glaube nicht, dass Henderson da ausholen wollte, das war Lebrechts Part.

    Für mein Gefühl war es ein Eigentor Hendersons, der da zu wenig Souveränität beweist. Es ist die Haltung eines Argumente-Sammlers, der jemandem eine reinzwiebeln möchte. Henderson drückt da als Telegraph-Autor einfach zu sehr auf die Tube. Wer ist er schon, dass er das Schaffen von King Crimson und Grateful Dead in einem Federstreich resümieren könnte? In diesem Zusammenhang ist es übrigens schon relevant, ob man King Crimson kennt oder nicht, denn King Crimson zu Mahler verhält sich sicher nicht wie „Star Wars“ zu Immanuel Kant.

    „Because“ von den Beatles enthält die rückwärts gespielte Mondscheinsonate Ludwig van Beethovens, der Pink Floyd-Keyboarder Richard Wright zitiert auf dem Album „The Dark Side of The Moon“ die blauesten Bill-Evans-Akkorde von „So What“ auf „Kind of Blue“ von Miles Davis, die wiederum mit dem französischen Impressionismus und der Harmonik von Maurice Ravel und Claude Debussy verwandt sind. Da ist nichts Großartiges für einen Musiker dabei, auch Mahler-Akkorde oder rhythmische Passagen oder Figuren sind nicht von einem anderen Stern. Wenn ich an einige Sechzehntel-Streicherpassagen in der Sechsten denke, so erscheinen mir die chromatischen fugenhaften Ausschweifungen Robert Fripps, einem der prägenden Musiker King Crimsons, gar nicht so weit davon entfernt. Bei Fripp spielt das auch in die Welt von Philip Glass hinüber, bei Mahlers Sechster sind die Sechzehntel-Furien hingegen nur ein erstaunlicher Bestandteil der Orchestrierung, zum Beispiel im Finale ab Partiturziffer 150.

    clasjazHierher, Stuttgart ist das Nächste, verirren sich die Großen selten

    Dafür hattest Du die Möglichkeit, die tolle Zeit Michael Gielens beim SWF mitzuerleben, und wer weiß? Vielleicht sogar noch Carlos Kleiber?

    --

    Tout en haut d'une forteresse, offerte aux vents les plus clairs, totalement soumise au soleil, aveuglée par la lumière et jamais dans les coins d'ombre, j'écoute.
    Highlights von Rolling-Stone.de
    Werbung
    #4075677  | PERMALINK

    Anonym
    Inaktiv

    Registriert seit: 01.01.1970

    Beiträge: 0

    Dieser Tage habe ich zwei interessante Mahler-Einspielungen (IV. und IX.) des Dirigenten Leopold Ludwig gehört. Die auf Vinyl, als MP3 sowie die IV. auch auf YouTube zu hören sind. Dieser Dirigent hat zwar einige braune Flecken in seiner Biografie, die er bewusst verschwiegen hat, worauf er im April 1946 von einem britischen Militärgericht zu eineinhalb Jahren Gefängnis (auf Bewährung) verurteilt wurde. – Davon abgesehen sind die beiden Mahler-Aufnahmen, die mir bislang entgangen sind, sehr hörenswert – vor allem Ludwigs Einspielung von GMs IV.

    Gustav Mahler: Symphonie No. 4 (Mono Version)
    Sächsische Staatskapelle Dresden, Leopold Ludwig

    Leopold Ludwig wurde 1958 in Hamburg mit der Johannes-Brahms-Medaille ausgezeichnet. 1968 verlieh ihm der Hamburger Senat den Titel Professor (siehe: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_Ludwig) .

    --

    #4075679  | PERMALINK

    soulpope
    "Ever Since The World Ended, I Don`t Get Out So Much"

    Registriert seit: 02.12.2013

    Beiträge: 25,619

    PopmuseumDieser Tage habe ich zwei interessante Mahler-Einspielungen (IV. und IX.) des Dirigenten Leopold Ludwig gehört. Die auf Vinyl, als MP3 sowie die IV. auch auf YouTube zu hören sind. Dieser Dirigent hat zwar einige braune Flecken in seiner Biografie, die er bewusst verschwiegen hat, worauf er im April 1946 von einem britischen Militärgericht zu eineinhalb Jahren Gefängnis (auf Bewährung) verurteilt wurde. – Davon abgesehen sind die beiden Mahler-Aufnahmen, die mir bislang entgangen sind, sehr hörenswert – vor allem Ludwigs Einspielung von GMs IV.

    Gustav Mahler: Symphonie No. 4 (Mono Version)
    Sächsische Staatskapelle Dresden, Leopold Ludwig


    :
    :
    Leopold Ludwig wurde 1958 in Hamburg mit der Johannes-Brahms-Medaille ausgezeichnet. 1968 verlieh ihm der Hamburger Senat den Titel Professor (siehe: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_Ludwig) .

    Danke für den Hinweis ….

    --

      "Kunst ist schön, macht aber viel Arbeit" (K. Valentin)
    #4075681  | PERMALINK

    Anonym
    Inaktiv

    Registriert seit: 01.01.1970

    Beiträge: 0

    soulpopeDanke für den Hinweis ….

    Gern geschehen.

    --

    #10074561  | PERMALINK

    Anonym
    Inaktiv

    Registriert seit: 01.01.1970

    Beiträge: 0

    Neueinspielung von Gustav Mahlers Symphonie Nr. 9:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCGXMP2nues
    Gustav Mahler – Symphonie Nr. 9
    McGill Symphony Orchestra Montreal,
    Alexis Hauser, Artistic Director and Conductor

    Aktuelle Mitteilung, die hier vielleicht jemand interessiert, umso mehr als der Dirigent darum gebeten hat: „Am 29. Oktober 2016 wurde unsere Aufführung der Neunten Symphonie von Gustav Mahler gemeinsam mit der Canadian Broadcasting Corporation per video webcast übertragen. Seit zwei Tagen ist diese Live-Aufführung auf public You Tube erschienen. Ich würde mich freuen, wenn Sie den unten angegebenen Link an Ihre Mitglieder sowie an die Konzertveranstalter in Wien und anderen Städten weiterleiten könnten. Mit den besten Grüßen und allen guten Wünschen aus Montréal, Alexis Hauser ( http://www.alexishauser.com)

    Link:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCGXMP2nues
    Gustav Mahler – Symphonie Nr. 9
    McGill Symphony Orchestra Montreal,
    Alexis Hauser, Artistic Director and Conductor

    --

    #10439009  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 48,511

    Die hier kam heute, Monate nach der Bestellung:

    Leider eine CD-R mit ziemlich billig kopiertem Booklet … @soulpope Hast Du davon eine richtige CD oder auch nur eine CD-R? Frage mich, ob ich zu spät war für die CD oder ob es gar nie ordentlich gepressete CDs gab – kennr das Label nicht (Unicorn), auf dem Cover steht (p)(c ) 1988 – hatte irgendwie gemeint, das sei eine neue Ausgabe. Da, wo ich bestellt habe, steht demn auch 2016 (und CD, aber due deklarieren nur ihre eigenen CD-Rs als solche):
    https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/classical/products/8113055–mahler-symphony-no-1-in-d-major-titan

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM - Corona-Extraprogramm im April und Mai: gypsy goes jazz, #99: The Real McCoy - McCoy Tyner (1938-2020), 14.4., 22:00; #100: The Gentle Giant: Yusef Lateef (1920-2013), 12.5., 21:00 (2 Stunden!); #101: 9.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #5: The Pain and Joy of ZA Jazz, 23.4., 22:00 | No Problem Saloon, #14: Funky Longtracks, 11.4., 20:30; #15: 28.4., 21:00
    #10439049  | PERMALINK

    soulpope
    "Ever Since The World Ended, I Don`t Get Out So Much"

    Registriert seit: 02.12.2013

    Beiträge: 25,619

    gypsy-tail-windDie hier kam heute, Monate nach der Bestellung: Leider eine CD-R mit ziemlich billig kopiertem Booklet … @soulpope Hast Du davon eine richtige CD oder auch nur eine CD-R? Frage mich, ob ich zu spät war für die CD oder ob es gar nie ordentlich gepressete CDs gab – kennr das Label nicht (Unicorn), auf dem Cover steht (p)(c ) 1988 – hatte irgendwie gemeint, das sei eine neue Ausgabe. Da, wo ich bestellt habe, steht demn auch 2016 (und CD, aber due deklarieren nur ihre eigenen CD-Rs als solche): https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/classical/products/8113055–mahler-symphony-no-1-in-d-major-titan

    Ich hab das aus  den mitt90ern und das war/ist eine CD …. diese Unart mit CD-R Ramsch bei Reissue Neuauflagen ist kriminell und lässt mich immer öfter von Käufen Abstand nehmen – wenn man sichergehen ergo  die originalen CD-Ausgaben haben möchte wird oft Absurdistan verlangt …..

    --

      "Kunst ist schön, macht aber viel Arbeit" (K. Valentin)
    #10439173  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 48,511

    Alles klar, danke – dann gehe ich mal davon aus, dass das 2016er-Reissue darin bestand, dass irgendwer von der 1988er-Ausgabe jetzt auch CD-Rs für 15€ anbietet, die dann aber drei Monate Herstellungszeit brauchen (ich hatte die Bestellung im Dezember aufgegeben und mich neulich noch gefreut über die Versandbestätigung … tja, ich mache dann schleunigst mal ein Back-Up).

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM - Corona-Extraprogramm im April und Mai: gypsy goes jazz, #99: The Real McCoy - McCoy Tyner (1938-2020), 14.4., 22:00; #100: The Gentle Giant: Yusef Lateef (1920-2013), 12.5., 21:00 (2 Stunden!); #101: 9.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #5: The Pain and Joy of ZA Jazz, 23.4., 22:00 | No Problem Saloon, #14: Funky Longtracks, 11.4., 20:30; #15: 28.4., 21:00
    #10458463  | PERMALINK

    bullschuetz

    Registriert seit: 16.12.2008

    Beiträge: 1,627

    clasjaz Die Tatsache, dass das verdammte Adagietto aus V das beliebteste seiner Stücke ist, zugleich aber man sich darüber belehren kann, dass dieses Ding eine werkimmanente Parodie ist, zeigt, dass etwas nicht stimmt mit Mahlers Schönheit. M., scheint mir, kämpft mit der Ironie – zu bändigen ist sie aber nicht, wenn man sie einmal entdeckt hat.

    Entschuldige bitte die klassiklaienhafte Frage: An welchen melodischen, harmonischen, rhythmischen oder sonstigen musikimmanenten Gestaltungselementen machst du deinen Befund fest, dass das „verdammte Adagietto“ parodistisch und ironisch zu verstehen sei?

     

    zuletzt geändert von bullschuetz

    --

    #10458659  | PERMALINK

    clasjaz

    Registriert seit: 19.03.2010

    Beiträge: 1,695

    bullschuetz

    clasjaz Die Tatsache, dass das verdammte Adagietto aus V das beliebteste seiner Stücke ist, zugleich aber man sich darüber belehren kann, dass dieses Ding eine werkimmanente Parodie ist, zeigt, dass etwas nicht stimmt mit Mahlers Schönheit. M., scheint mir, kämpft mit der Ironie – zu bändigen ist sie aber nicht, wenn man sie einmal entdeckt hat.

    Entschuldige bitte die klassiklaienhafte Frage: An welchen melodischen, harmonischen, rhythmischen oder sonstigen musikimmanenten Gestaltungselementen machst du deinen Befund fest, dass das „verdammte Adagietto“ parodistisch und ironisch zu verstehen sei?

    Klassiklaienhaft ist Deine Frage nicht, zumal ich kein „Experte“ bin. Du hast da übrigens eine Bemerkung ausgegraben, die schon einige Tage auf den Schultern hat. Ich versuche trotzdem, es zu erklären.

    Melodie, Harmonie, Rhythmik – ich finde es gar nicht so einfach, sie auseinanderzuhalten, es sind drei Zahnräder, wobei die Melodie bei Mahler das unwichtigste ist, scheint mir. Es gibt eine Art Streit zwischen Rhythmik und womöglich beabsichtigter Melodie bei Mahler, dem er am ehesten in Sätzen beikommt, die keine „langsamen“ sind, obwohl sich auch diese Art Zeitgefühl bei Mahler völlig verschieben kann. Ich finde etwa den ersten Satz der Neunten von einer wunderbaren Melodie angeschoben, weitergetragen und zu Ende geführt. Das noch weitere Sätze folgen, ist ein eigenes Enigma.

    Und da ist dieses Adagietto, der Beginn der „Dritten Abteilung“ in der Fünften, d. h. es ist kein geruhsames Intermezzo, sondern ein Vorspiel zum Rondo – eigenartig genug, allerdings. „Verdammt“ habe ich den Satz wohl genannt, weil er so gerne isoliert wird, zur Zurücklehnung – das melodische Fundament, die Rückert-Lieder, das zweite Kindertotenlied, dann das „Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen“, ist auch einnehmend genug. Isoliert – ich spreche jetzt gar nicht von Viscontis Instrumentalisierung, das Missverständnis passt ja zu Aschenbach, auch wenn es mich nervt -, wie mich also die Isolierung dieses Adagettio überhaupt befremdet.

    Und nicht nur wegen dieser Befremdung stellt sich Ironie ein – als Gedanke, als Idee. Nicht in dem einfachen, tradierten Sinn, etwas anderes zu sagen, als man meint. Sondern im Sinn des Vorbehalts. Und beides ergänzt sich für mich und stimmt für das Adagietto als Vorbereitung. Wie soll man, frage ich mich, gerade in der Instrumentalmusik etwas ironisieren, wenn nicht – werkimmanent – durch Themenbezüge und Verflechtungen und Herstellen von Zusammenhängen. Das geschieht zum Adagietto im folgenden Rondo. Die Ironie leugnet also nicht, aber sie äußert einen Vorbehalt, so verstehe ich sie.

    Interessanterweise werden gerade das Adagietto und der dritte Satz der Sechsten (zum Glück ist es inzwischen der dritte) gerne gehört. Diese beiden langsamen Sätze sind mir – werkimmanent gesehen – die unverständlichsten, solange ich sie nicht mit dem ironischen Vorbehalt, der mir persönlich gerade durch ihre „Umgebung“ von teils destruierendem Maß, Erkenntnishilfe ist, höre. Ob ich ihn nun heraushöre, weil sie sich mir so erklären (siehe oben, Wunsch zur Melodie gegen die rhythmische Welt), oder ob ich mich irgendwann völlig geirrt habe, kann ich nicht sagen. Die langsamen Sätze, bei denen ich Mahler völlig folgen kann, sind der Schlusssatz der Dritten, obwohl er mich nicht mehr sehr reizt, und das Ende der Neunten. Beide stehen am Ende und beschließen tatsächlich die Werke. Das ist, nebenbei, womöglich ein großer Unterschied zu Bruckner, der tatsächlich, soweit ich das bisher sagen kann, immer große „langsame“ Sätze geschrieben hat, die „für sich“ stehen. Mahlers Adagietto aus der Fünften steht nicht für sich. Darin liegt die Ironie. Und womöglich die Parodie, zu einer gegebenen Zeit, die Mahler dann mit dem letzten Satz der Neunten und der völligen Absorbierung in den Entwürfen zur Zehnten aufgegeben hat.

    Noch ein P. S., das mir gerade einfällt, obwohl das meine erste Frage hätte sein müssen. Was interessiert Dich, bullschuetz, an diesem Adagietto, was ist Deine Meinung dazu?

    zuletzt geändert von clasjaz

    --

    #10460229  | PERMALINK

    bullschuetz

    Registriert seit: 16.12.2008

    Beiträge: 1,627

    Herzlichen Dank für die ausführliche Antwort! Ich bin derzeit dabei, Mahler zu entdecken, stehe noch ganz am Anfang und habe mich in den vergangenen Tagen an der Fünften festgehoert. Parallel dazu begann ich hier und dort zu lesen, schaute mir nochmal den Visconti-Film an, eins kam zum andern …

    Deine Antwort hilft mir, weil sie mir klar macht, wie wichtig für das Adagietto der Kontext ist, das, was vorausgeht, das, was folgt. Insofern ist dieses Adagietto tatsächlich „verdammt“ – nämlich zum Dasein als einer dieser dekontextualisierten „Greatest hits of classic“ .

    Ich bin mir der Zumutung bewusst, die sich ergibt, wenn ich hier jahrealte Aussagen ausgrabe und Erläuterungen dazu will. Betrachte es bitte als Zeichen der Wertschätzung. Deine Mahler-Ausfuehrungen haben mich eben gepackt.

    zuletzt geändert von bullschuetz

    --

    #10460547  | PERMALINK

    clasjaz

    Registriert seit: 19.03.2010

    Beiträge: 1,695

    Danke Dir für Deine freundlichen Zeilen, @bullschuetz, und es ist sicher keine Zumutung, sich auf alte Beiträge zu beziehen; es ist nur ungewöhnlich, weil wir ja hier meist nur von Tag zu Tag sprechen.

    Mit der Fünften von Mahler habe auch ich begonnen – aber was heißt Beginnen bei Mahler, ich finde bis heute kein Ende, immer wieder Pausen, dann kommt er wieder hervor, Neues will gehört werden, Altes anders, und das Leben, das immer weitergeht, fordert auch sein Recht bei dieser Musik. Wen hörst Du gerade mit Mahlers Fünfter?

    Und das Wort vom „Dasein einer dieser dekontextualisierten ‚Greatest Hits of Classic“ finde ich sehr gut; ich habe es schlicht nicht so gut zusammengefasst wie Du.

    Im „Netz“ gibt es noch eine große Mahlerplattenrezensionsorgie, von Tony Duggan. Sie ist nicht übel, weil es nicht nur um die jeweilige Einspielung geht, sondern immer auch um das Werk – en détail. Zur Fünften gibt es das hier.

    Und es ist seltsam, wie sehr Mahler zuerst Lieder findet – im Adagietto ist das bloß melodisch zitiert, die Wunderhornlieder dagegen kommen in den früheren Symphonien häufiger und bestimmender vor – und dann doch die Symphonie braucht, um das Lied „zu verstehen“; ein bisschen zuletzt geholfen bei diesem Dilemma hat er sich dann zuerst in der Achten (vielmehr ist er aufs Dilemma zurückgekommen, nach dem Abwurf in V, VI und VII) , aber sehr viel mehr im „Lied von der Erde“. Aber es gibt da keine Richtungen, bei denen man sich wirklich orientieren könnte – genau diese Freiheit gibt Mahler auch, dachte ich immer, und ihm wird es Kopfzerbrechen bereitet haben.

    Manchmal sehe ich auch gerne Aufführungen von Mahlersymphonien an. Da sitzen die Musiker nicht wie oft sonst nur teilnahmslos herum, wenn sie nichts zu tun haben, sondern achten auf jeden Ton der anderen. Ich bilde mir ein, das könne kein Zufall sein.

    Erzähle dann bitte weiter, wenn Du Lust hast?

    --

    #10460565  | PERMALINK

    gruenschnabel

    Registriert seit: 19.01.2013

    Beiträge: 5,827

    bullschuetz
    Deine Antwort hilft mir, weil sie mir klar macht, wie wichtig für das Adagietto der Kontext ist, das, was vorausgeht, das, was folgt. Insofern ist dieses Adagietto tatsächlich „verdammt“ – nämlich zum Dasein als einer dieser dekontextualisierten „Greatest hits of classic“ .

    Zum einen: Ja, treffend formuliert. Und ich wüsste keinen einzigen Satz einer Mahler-Sinfonie, der wirklich für sich steht.
    Zum anderen: Ich finde solche „Dekontextualisierungen“ nicht wirklich „verdammungswürdig“. Soll Visconti doch machen, wenn er darin einen künstlerischen Wert erkennt. Ich meine das gar nicht „pädagogisch“ nach dem Motto: So bekommen Leute wenigstens einen Zugang zu Mahler. Das funktioniert m.E. nicht. Aber ich möchte auch nicht einer Unantastbarkeit das Wort reden. Und sehe prinzipiell keinen Grund, warum man dem Adagietto nicht etwas abgewinnen könnte, das des größeren Zusammenhanges der Sinfonie nicht bedarf.

    zuletzt geändert von gruenschnabel

    --

    #10461115  | PERMALINK

    bullschuetz

    Registriert seit: 16.12.2008

    Beiträge: 1,627

    @clasjaz Ich stehe wirklich noch ganz am Anfang, habe mir eine Box „The complete Mahler Symphonies“ Bernstein/NY Philharmonic zugelegt, mit der Fünften begonnen und komme seit Tagen nicht zu den anderen, weil ich die eine nochmal und nochmal höre, mal am Stück, mal einen einzelnen Satz zwei, drei Mal hintereinander, also auch aus dem Zusammenhang gerissen, und kann bisher im Grunde nicht mehr sagen, als dass ich gebannt bin.

    Erschwerend kommt hinzu, dass ich seit Jahrzehnten zwar einigermaßen regelmäßig, aber doch eher selten Klassik höre, was sich erst im vergangenen Jahr geändert hat. Ich bin also nicht nur in Sachen Mahler Laie, kann aber sagen, dass der Impuls, tiefer einzusteigen, wie vor einigen Jahren beim Jazz dank dieses segensreichen Forums kam.

    --

    #10461259  | PERMALINK

    clasjaz

    Registriert seit: 19.03.2010

    Beiträge: 1,695

    @bullschuetz Bernstein mit den New Yorkern ist sicher nicht die schlechteste Leiter; es gibt da andere Meinungen, aber sie müssen sicher erst interessieren, wenn  sie für einen selbst von Interesse sind. Darüber würde ich mir nur begrenzt Gedanken machen; Bernstein meint Mahler sicher sehr ernst. Ich möchte, auch an @gruenschnabel gesagt, hier auch nicht als Kontext- oder Zusammenhangsfetischist auftreten, meine Antwort oben bezog sich ja nur auf die Frage zum „Adagietto“ und meiner Bemerkung zu dem „verdammten Ding“. Man kann alles isoliert hören und sich sogar nur ein paar Takte heraussuchen, warum denn nicht? Zwar ist etwas daran, dass das Ganze mehr sei als die Summe der Teile, trotzdem sind die Teile bestimmende Formen, die sich nun einmal aufeinander beziehen. Und dann bleibt immer noch die Frage – und eben die Tatsache -, dass die symphonische Form das von Mahler Gewählte ist und dazu noch die Form der klassischen Symphonie, auch wenn sie in den Einzelsätzen ständig infrage gestellt wird, wieder ein eigenes Problem: das heißt aber dennoch, Mahler hält am großen Zusammenhang offenbar fest. Und das ist dann doch vielleicht zu bedenken, je länger man Mahler hört. Oder andere Komponisten mit diesen Monumentalansprüchen, die Mahler hat. Ob sie gut sind, einlösbar usw., ist wieder eine völlig andere Frage.

    Ich bin jedenfalls sehr an Deinen weiteren Gängen bei Mahler interessiert, bullschuetz. Ich möchte keinen Rat geben, aber mir fiel gerade ein, dass zu einem Verhältnis von Adagietto und Rondo (und fast müsste ich das Zentrum des Scherzos gleich dazu nennen, aber dann bin ich wieder zu sehr bei Zusammenhängen) in der Fünften die erste Symphonie im Vergleich interessant sein könnte. Der dritte Satz – ein ganz anderes Adagietto* -, auf den eine „stürmische Bewegung“ folgt, die womöglich noch etwas jugendlich-frisch ist, aber sehr präzise. Das mag aber auch an dem Gestus liegen: „Bitte keine Widerworte“. Das hat Mahler dann sehr bald aufgegeben.

    *Die Satzbezeichnung des dritten Satzes der Ersten: „Feierlich und gemessen, ohne zu schleppen“ passt ganz gut auch zum Adagietto, finde ich. Gerade das „gemessen“ trüge den Marsch, der überall sonst in der Fünften steckt, auch in das Viscontistück. Viel wichtiger ist aber wohl in beiden Sätzen, dritter der Ersten, vierter der Fünften: „ohne zu schleppen“.

    --

Ansicht von 15 Beiträgen - 136 bis 150 (von insgesamt 171)

Schlagwörter: ,

Du musst angemeldet sein, um auf dieses Thema antworten zu können.