Andrew Hill

Ansicht von 15 Beiträgen - 1 bis 15 (von insgesamt 108)
  • Autor
    Beiträge
  • #73609  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 61,836

    AndrewHill_phFrancisWolff-2_zpsxj9h7q67.jpg
    (Photo: Frank Wolff)

    Ich habe die Musik Andrew Hills in der zweiten Hälfte der 90er Jahre durch das Mosaic-Set (MD7-161 von 1995, es gab auch MQ10-161, die LP-Version davon) kennen gelernt, als sonst kaum was von ihm zu finden war – jedenfalls keine der klassischen Blue Note Einspielungen.

    Hill ist 1931 (nicht 1937) in Chicago geboren worden (nicht wie es oft hiess in Port-au-Prince, Haiti). Michael Cuscuna zitiert Hill in seiner Einleitung im Mosaic-Booklet:

    Andrew told me recently, „It seemed like a good career move at the time. I was spelling my name with an E on the end for a while. I met Andrew Cyrille, and he told me that was a Haitian name. Boom, I was Haitian. Growing up in the black belt, no matter how high I rose, I could only go so far because there was such a color caste system in Chicago. So being from Haiti was a good neutralizer. But then, of course, as soon as I got that going, black nationalism came in. Just my luck!“

    ~ Michael Cuscuna: Andrew Hill (March 1995), Liner Notes zu „The Complete Blue Note Andrew Hill Sessions (1963-66)“, Mosaic MD7-161, 1995, p. 1

    Zur Frage des Geburtsjahres:

    According to an obituary by Howard Mandel, Andrew Hill was born in Chicago on June 30, 1931. Whether he shaved the 6 years off his age, or allowed others to do it, during his lifetime his year of birth was almost always given as 1937, and the place was sometimes said to be Port au Prince, Haiti. Hill was 26 years old when he made the Ping sides. He had been a member of the Freeman Brothers band for a time, and may have appeared with them on a November 1954 session for Blue Lake, backing a vocal group called the Maples; he was definitely in the Dave Shipp Quintet when it recorded a bop session for Vee-Jay on November 4 of that year. But he only emerged as a notable artist in the 1960s, when he was considered part of the second wave of avant gardists, after the initial wave established by John Coltrane, Ornette Coleman, Sun Ra, and Cecil Taylor.

    Hill’s reputed birth in Haiti was a bit of fiction that Hill concocted early in his career to help him overcome the „color caste system in Chicago.“ He came out of an impoverished family, and used to panhandle on the street playing an old accordion and tap dancing. His partner was Leo Blevins, later a prominent local guitarist, who accompanied on a washtub bass. He reached out to such mentors as Earl Hines, William Russo, and Paul Hindemith to become literate in music. Hill told jazz scribe John MacCalkies that he was influenced by Gene Ammons and Tom Archia; in a conversation with Ted Panken he referred to Willie Jones as an inspiration. The Ping sides raised Hill’s profile in the postwar Chicago jazz community; he was soon playing house piano in clubs alongside such notables as Gene Ammons, Johnny Griffin, and Ira Sullivan. Hill claimed to jazz reporter Lloyd Sachs that, „Chicago was a good time for me, I was working 99 percent of the time.“ Certainly Hill’s trios (and occasional larger combos) were regularly cited in Chicago Defender entertainment advertisements from 1956 through 1959. In fact, Hill’s groups were often featured at Roberts Show Lounge.

    ~ The Ping Records Discography, von Robert L. Campbell und Leonard J. Bukowski (Latest revision: February 14, 2008): http://myweb.clemson.edu/~campber/ping.html (Zugriff: 2011-01-22 / neuer Link: 2016-02-21)

    (Leo Blevins kann man übrigens auf dem Clifford Brown/Max Roach Doppel-Album „Live at the Bee Hive“ hören, das 1955 mit der Brown-Roach Gruppe inkl. Sonny Rollins und George Morrow, sowie den Chicago-Locals Blevins, Billy Wallace und Nicky HIll, aufgenommen wurde.)

    1950 spielte Hill Klavier, von Pat Patrick lernte er die ersten Blues Changes. 1952 hat er mit Charlie Parker gespielt, seinen ersten professionellen Job hatte er 1953 mit Paul Williams, einem R&B Bandleader – Hill spielte Piano und Barisax. Er machte sich in den folgenden Jahren dank Sessions mit Von Freeman, Gene Ammons, Roy Eldrige, Ben Webster, Serge Chaloff, Ira Sullivan, Miles Davis oder der Johnny Griffin/Eddie „Lockjaw“ Davis Band einen Namen. Erste Aufnahmen entstanden 1954 für Vee Jay unter der Leitung von Bassist David Shipp, Saxophonist Porter Kilbert war auch mit dabei.
    Barry Harris wurde in dieser Zeit zu einer Art Mentor, der Hill mit der Musik von Bud Powell vertraut machte. Neben Bud waren Monk und Art Tatum die wichtigsten Einflüsse auf Hills Musik und Klaveierspiel.

    He told A.B. Spellman in the liner notes for BLACK FIRE, „Monk’s like Ravel and Debussy to me, in that he’s put a lot of personality into his playing, and no matter what the technical contributions of Monk’s music are, it is the personality of the music which makes it, finally. Bud is an even greater influence, but his music is a dead end. I mean, if you stay with Bud too much, you’ll always sound like him, even if you’re doing something he never did. Tatum, well, all modern piano playing’s Tatum.

    ~ Michael Cuscuna: Andrew Hill (March 1995), Liner Notes zu „The Complete Blue Note Andrew Hill Sessions (1963-66)“, Mosaic MD7-161, 1995, p. 1

    Irgendwann in den 50ern spielte Hill zudem zwei Singles für das Ping Label ein, eine im Trio mit Leroy Jackson (b) und Wilbur Campbell (d), sowie eine im Quintett, zusätzlich mit Pat Patrick und Von Freeman. Abgesehen von einer Porter Kilbert Session veröffentlichte Ping anscheinend Gospel. Mehr über Ping findet sich hier: http://myweb.clemson.edu/~campber/ping.html – auch ein Foto von Andrew Hill um 1957. Hier k man zudem „Lanky Linda“ hören von der ersten Ping-Session, in der eine Combo unter Leitung Hills und mit Von Freeman und Pat Patrick, eine Vokalgruppe namens The Debonaires begleitet (EDIT, 2016-02-21: der Link geht nicht mehr, ich weiss nicht, ob das Stück noch irgendwo online gehört werden kann). Die B-Side der zweiten Hill-Single, „Down Pat“ (aka „Down Patrick“, das Stück stammt von Pat Patrick), kann man hier hören. Auf Von Freemans „After Dark“ spielt Hill Orgel – gibt es hier zu hören!

    Hill formte dann ein Trio mit Malachi Favors am Bass und James Slaughter, mit dem er – gemäss Cuscunas Notes im Mosaic-Set – ca. 1959 das Warwick-Album So In Love with the Sound of Andrew Hill einspielte. Das Album versank rasch in Vergessenheit. In den 70ern erschien auf TCB (no relation zum TCB-Label von Drummer Peter Schmidlin, soweit ich weiss) mit Streicher-Overdubs und später bei Fresh Sound auf CD. Es ist kein grosses vergessenes Frühwerk – Hill war erst in den frühen 60ern bereit und reif, seine eigene Musik zu machen. Auf diesem Album hört man ihn mit Standards (Body and Soul, Spring Is Here, Old Devil Moon…) und wenig deutet auf den aussergewöhnlichen Denker, Konzeptionisten, Komponisten und Pianisten hin, zu dem Hill sich in den nächsten Jahren entwickeln sollte.

    1961 zog Hill mit der Band von Dinah Washington los, erstmals on the road. Schliesslich landete er in New York und spielte dort mit Johnny Hartman, Al Hibbler, Kenny Dorham, Johnny Griffin/Eddie „Lockjaw“ Davis und Jackie McLean. Mit Roland Kirks Quartett spielte er für eine etwas längere Zeit, reiste nach Chicago, um im September 1962 für Mercury eine Session einzuspielen, die auf der ersten Hälfte von Kirks Klassiker Domino zu hören sein sollte (die zweite Hälfte des Mercury-Albums wurde schon im April mit Wynton Kelly eingespielt). Hill ist da in Richie Powells „Time“ auch an der Celesta zu hören. Auch im September 1962 nahm Hill an der Aufnahme von Walt Dickersons grossartigem Prestige-Album To My Queen teil, und schon im Juli 1962 wurde das Konzert mit Kirks Quartett in Newport mitgeschnitten – leider ist davon offiziell bisher nur ein Stück als Bonus in der grossen 10CD-Box von Kirks Mercury-Aufnahmen erschienen, aber die Musik ist in circulation.

    Hill berichtete über die Abenteuer mit Kirk wie folgt:

    Hill, who had become his regular pianist by the time Kirk resumed recording in September, recalled Kirk being „very vocal around the time of the church bombings in Alabama“ and saying „some things at a club in Rochester [New York] that caused the police to meet us at our hotel. The next thing I knew the police department was literally right outside our hotel with attack dogs, trying to take us off to jail. Roland fought with them. He could handle himself anywhere. He gave them a few bright moments to remember… just about broke one policeman’s neck! They took us all off to jail, even those of us who weren’t participating. He kept sayin‘, ‚They won’t put a blind person in jail.‘ It goes without saying that was the end of the job. After the fine was paid, we were allowed to leave for California, providing we didn’t come back! Those were some lovely years of my life,“ Hill said thoughtfully.

    ~ John Kruth (July 2000), Liner Notes zu „Roland Kirk – Domino“, Verve Master Edition CD, 2000

    Nachdem der Gig mit Kirk vorbei war, blieb Hill ein halbes Jahr in Kalifornien, spielte etwa mit Howard Rumseys Lighthouse All-Stars und nahm mit Jimmy Woods dessen tolles Contemporary Album Conflict auf. Hier ist Hills persönlicher Stil erstmals wahrnehmbar – Cuscuna nennt ihn „percussive, crystalline, harmonically rich“ (Mosaic-Booklet, p. 2). In Los Angeles lernte er auch Laverne Gillette kennen und heiratete sie (sie verstarb im November 1989 nach einem langen Kampf gegen den Krebs).
    Nach der Rückkehr nach New York begann Hill, mit Joe Henderson zu üben. Dieser war über Kenny Dorham zum Blue Note Label gestossen. Im September 1963 nahm Henderson (mit KD) sein zweites Album für Blue Note auf, Our Thing – Andrew Hill spielte Klavier, Eddie Khan und Pete LaRoca vervollständigten das tolle Quintett. Einen Monat später holte Alfred Lion Hill für eine Hank Mobley Session, die auf No Room for Squares landen sollte, erneut ins Studio.

    Alfred Lion nahm Hill unter seine Fittiche – er nannte ihn später zurückblickend seinen „last great protegé“. Nach den ersten Aufnahme-Sessions mit Hill liess Lion Hill vorspielen und war von der Menge an einzigartigem Material beeindruckt.

    Alfred told me in 1986 that it was like the first time he heard Monk and Herbie Nichols. The material as so original that he wanted to record everything they’d composed. And, like Monk and Nichols, he recorded a financially-burdensome amount of Andrew’s material before a single note was released. Four albums were in the can before the first, BLACK FIRE, was issued.
    In Alfred Lion and Frank Wolff, Andrew found compassionate fans and real friends. He spent countless hours with both of them talking about everything but music. He was taken with the breadth of their experiences, being Europeans who’d fled a Germany overtaken by Hitler. They in turn were fascinated by his quick mind and interest in things beyond music.
    Andrew Hill had found a home. With Alfred’s help, he consistently got the finest musicians to realize his intricate music. And the Blue Note style of careful planning and rehearsals made his realizations possible.

    ~ Michael Cuscuna: Andrew Hill (March 1995), Liner Notes zu „The Complete Blue Note Andrew Hill Sessions (1963-66)“, Mosaic MD7-161, 1995, p. 2

    Ab November 1963 nahm Hill eine Reihe eindrücklicher Sessions für Blue Note auf, aus denen Alben wie Black Fire, Smokestack, Judgement, Point of Departure, Andrew! und Compulsion hervorgingen – zu hören sind da u.a. Joe Henderson, Richard Davis, Eric Dolphy, Roy Haynes, Bobby Hutcherson, Elvin Jones, Freddie Hubbard, Tony Williams, John Gilmore und Joe Chambers. In diesen Zeitraum fällt schliesslich auch noch Bobby Hutchersons Album Diaglogue, an dem neben Hill auch Freddie Hubbard und Sam Rivers beteiligt waren. Weitere Aufnahmen erschienen später auf One for One und Involution. Nach 1968 nahm die Musik Hills konzeptionell etwas an Strenge ab, es folgten weitere Blue Note-Alben wie Grass Roots und Lift Every Voice.
    Hill ging weiterhin mit grosser Regelmässigkeit ins Van Gelder Studio, um für Blue Note aufzunehmen, aber der grösste Teil blieb bis vor einigen Jahren im Kasten. Auf dem Mosaic Select #16 sind die Studio-Sessions der Jahre 1967-70 dokumentiert, die Michael Cuscuna in Zusammenarbeit mit Hill 2005 herausgegeben hat (zudem enthält das Booklet auch eine vollständige Diskographie aller Blue Note Sessions, an denen Hill zwischen 1962 und 1990 mitgewirkt hat – dass „Time Lines“ da noch fehlt leuchtet mir ja ein, aber „The Invisible Hand“ ging anscheinend vergessen).

    One afternoon, I visited his apartment on Central Park West and he started playing me some acetates or test pressings of Blue Note material that was still unissued. As an avid fan, the fact that Hill sessions existed on tape that were still unreleased seemed incomprehensible to my 20-year-old mind.

    […]

    Recalling that afternoon in his apartment six or seven years earlier, I asked him if he remembered any of the sessions that were still hidden in the Blue Note vaults. He proceeded to rattle off without hesitation the personnel of 11 sessions that remained unissued; it later turned out he had named only one bassist and two drummers wrong! He warned me that some of them might not be as good as they looked on paper, saying „I was having trouble at that time finding people to play my music the way I heard it.“

    ~ Michael Cuscuna, Liner Notes zu „Mosaic Select #16: Andrew Hill“, 2005

    Das recht gradlinige Dance with Death erschien mit einigen Jahren Verspätung in der LT-Reihe von Blue Note (die erschien ab 1979, im Juni 1981 war Blue Note dann am Ende), und die 2003 veröffentlichte CD Passing Ships – eine Art Vorbote des Mosaic Selects – enthielt zuvor nicht veröffentlichte Aufnahmen mit einem tollen Nonett, die im November 1969 eingespielt wurden. Weitere unveröffentlichte Sessions wurden den CD-Reissues von Grass Roots und Lift Every Voice beigegeben. Cuscunas Kommentar aus dem Hill-Select zu letzterem: „a 1969 album with voices that musicians loved, critics hated and audiences ignored“.

    In den 1970ern verschwand Hill zunächst völlig von der Jazz-Szene, spielte in Colleges Solo-Konzert und zog nach Upstate New York (wo er sich ein Stück Land gekauft hatte mit Advances, die er für seine Blue Note Sessions erhalten hatte). Später nahm Hill dann für eine Vielzahl verschiedener Label auf, darunter 1974-76 insgesamt fünf Alben für Freedom (Spiral und Live at Montreux – produziert von Michael Cuscuna), Steeplechase (Divine Gemini und Invitation) und East Wind (Blueback, Homage und Nefertiti. Cuscuna begann dann auch langsam, die verborgenen Schätze aus dem Blue Note Archiv zu heben, stellte basierend auf Hills Auswahl als erstes die beiden Doppel-Alben One for One sowie Involution zusammen. Letzteres enthielt die 1967er Session mit Sam Rivers, gepaart mit einer der einzigen zuvor unveröffentlichten Blue Note Session von Rivers (die später auch im Rivers-Mosaic veröffentlicht wurde).

    1977 zogen Andrew und Laverne Hill nach Pittsburgh, CA. Hill tourte im Rahmen des California Arts Council, lehrte benachteiligte („emotionally-troubled“ nennt Cuscuna sie) Kinder, die von ihren Eltern vernachlässigt wurden. Für Artists House nahm Hill dann 1978 ausgedehnte Solo-Aufnahmen auf, die zuerst auf der LP From California with Love und 2006 auf dem Mosaic Select #23 in ausgedehnter Version veröffentlicht wurden.

    1980 nahm Hill zwei Alben für Soulnote auf: Strange Serenade und Faces of Hope – ich hoffe, dass es von den insgesamt vier Alben auch eine kleine Box geben wird!

    Im Februar 1985 fand in der New Yorker Town Hall das One Night with Blue Note Konzert statt, um den Neubeginn des Labels zu feiern und Rückschau zu halten. Daraus entwuchs dann das Mt. Fuji/Blue Note Festival, das 1986 in Japan statt fand. Hill erklärte sich bereit, dort aufzutreten, Cuscuna stellte Don Sickler an, um ein paar alte Stücke zu transkribieren…

    Of course, he arrived in Tokyo with a suitcase of new music, all of it gorgeous, and all of it intricate. We managed a couple of rehearsals before the outdoor festival began. The winds were high that day because a typhoon was heading straight to us. So all of Bobby Hutcherson’s parts blew away three minutes into the set. He winged it best he could. Andrew kept getting up during tunes, running around to everyone’s music stands. I thought he was securing their music down. Finally, Joe and Woody came over to me in the wings and said, „This music is hard enough to play. Can you get him to stop rewriting it while we’re playing it?“

    ~ Michael Cuscuna, Liner Notes zu „Mosaic Select 16: Andrew Hill“, 2005, p. 5

    Neben Woody Shaw, Joe Henderson und Bobby Hutcherson spielten in Hills Band pbrigens Ron Carter und Billy Higgins. Bisher habe ich davon keine Aufnahme gehört, hoffe aber, dass das Konzert (wie manches anderes vom Mt. Fuji Festival) dokumentiert worden ist.

    Es folgten zwei weitere Alben für Soul Note, Shades und Verona Rag (beide 1986). Ein paar Jahre später kehrte Hill zum neu formierten Blue Note zurück, um Eternal Spirit (1989) und But Not Farewell (1990) einzuspielen, beide von Michael Cuscuna produziert. Auf beiden wirkte der junge Saxophonist Greg Osby mit, auf dessen eigenem Blue Note-Album Invisible Hand Hill ein Jahrzehnt später mitwirken sollte.

    In den 90ern folgten wenige Sideman-Auftritte, darunter auf Reggie Workmans Summit Conference, einer All-Star Produktion auf dem Postcards Label. Neben Hill und dem Leader wirkten Sam Rivers und Pheeroan akLaff mit. 1993 enstand auch ein Duo-Album (das einzige Duo-Album Hills überhaupt) mit dem Schlagzeuger Chico Hamilton.

    In den letzten Jahren seines Lebens war Hill dann wieder sehr aktiv, hat auf Palmetto sein Sextett (Dusk) und seine Big Band (A Beautiful Day) präsentiert, hat mit Leuten wie Scott Colley (b), Gregory Tardy (ts,cl) oder Charles Tolliver (t) regelmässig getourt. 2003 hat er den rennomierten Jazzpar-Preis gewonnen und seine Oktett-Musik auf dem Album The Day the World Stood Still dokumentiert.

    2006 schliesslich folgte – auf Blue Note selbstredend – sein letztes Album, Time Lines. Am 20. April 2007 verstarb er an Krebs.

    20060407_16%20Hill_zps5bzqx4yc.jpg
    Andrew Hill, AMR Festival, Genf 2006 (Photo: Juan-Carlos Hernandez)

    Hills Ansagen auf den letzten Live-Bootlegs, die ich gehört habe, sind unglaublich rührend, seine Stimme ist praktisch verschwunden – ich will jetzt nicht sagen, sie käme schon aus dem Jenseits, aber sie kommt irgendwo aus einer ganz eigenen Welt, die endgültig dem Untergang gewidmet war.

    Hier finden sich eine Stunde Musik von Hills letztem Konzert, das am 29. März 2007 in der New Yorker Trinity Church stattfand (die Videos sind falsch numeriert auf Youtube):
    Part 1
    Part 2
    Andrew Hill (p), John Hébert (b), Eric McPherson (d)
    Trinity Church, NYC, March 29, 2007

    (EDIT, 2016-02-21: Diese Youtube-Links funktionieren nicht mehr, Audio habe ich davon, weiss heute nicht einmal mehr, ob das Video-Links waren oder nur Audio.)

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM: gypsy goes jazz, #133: Revivals in den 90ern und eine Neuheit aus der Romandie - 14.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #7: tba | No Problem Saloon, #29: tba
    Highlights von Rolling-Stone.de
    Werbung
    #7893649  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 61,836

    Habe vorhin mal Roland Kirks „Domino“ gehört, jetzt läuft Joe Hendersons „Our Thing“. „Domino“ ist ganz klar Kirks Show und gehört zu seinen besseren Alben, von Hill (und auf der anderen Session von Kelly) hört man recht wenig, und eigentlich auch kaum etwas, das aufhorchen machen würde.

    Bei „Our Thing“ ist das schon anders, da prägt Hill mit seinen dichten und leicht düster-melancholischen Akkorden den Klang der Gruppe stark. Da herrscht eine andere Stimmung als auf den KD/Henderson-Alben mit Tyner oder Hancock… etwas nachdenkliches, vielleicht streckenweise leicht depressives, das ganz klar von Hills Piano aus kommt (aber natürlich sowohl Henderson als auch Dorham sehr entgegenkommt).

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM: gypsy goes jazz, #133: Revivals in den 90ern und eine Neuheit aus der Romandie - 14.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #7: tba | No Problem Saloon, #29: tba
    #7893651  | PERMALINK

    vorgarten

    Registriert seit: 07.10.2007

    Beiträge: 9,795

    gypsy tail windNachdem der Gig mit Kirk vorbei war, blieb Hill ein halbes Jahr in Kalifornien, spielte etwa mit Howard Rumseys Lighthouse All-Stars und nahm mit Jimmy Woods dessen tolles Contemporary Album Conflict auf. Hier ist Hills persönlicher Stil erstmals wahrnehmbar – Cuscuna nennt ihn „percussive, crystalline, harmonically rich“ (Mosaic-Booklet, p. 2).

    vielen dank für diesen tollen post und vor allem für den CONFLICT-tipp. das ist wirklich großartig. hatte von jimmy woods noch nie etwas gehört.

    --

    #7893653  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 61,836

    vorgartenvielen dank für diesen tollen post und vor allem für den CONFLICT-tipp. das ist wirklich großartig. hatte von jimmy woods noch nie etwas gehört.

    Woods erstes Contemporary-Album ist auch sehr hörenswert (redbeans findet’s noch besser als „Conflict“, ich glaub eher eine Spur schwächer). Zudem gibt’s dann auch noch „Lookin‘ Good“ von Joe Gordon, auch auf Contemporary. Drei sehr schöne Alben, aus denen „Conflict“ ein wenig heraussticht, weil die Atmosphäre irgendwie ander ist… aber die drei gehören zu den feinsten Momenten von „black California“!

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM: gypsy goes jazz, #133: Revivals in den 90ern und eine Neuheit aus der Romandie - 14.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #7: tba | No Problem Saloon, #29: tba
    #7893655  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 61,836

    A bit of perspective. A month prior to this recording, John Coltrane had recorded LIVE AT BIRDLAND, continuing his expansion of the modal, open-ended approach to improvisation. Cecil Taylor’s most recent recording had been a year earlier for the Danish Debut label with a trio of alto saxophonist Jimmy Lyons, drummer Sunny Murray and himself. He was taking the the internal structures that he composed to the limit with extended and highly energizes performances. Ornette Coleman’s December 1962 Town Hall concert with a new trio of bassist David Izenzon and drummer Charles Moffett was his retirement party, though two-and-one-half years alter he’d pick up musically exactly where he’d left off. That summer, Eric Dolphy had begun to find an ensemble that could do his music justice on his FM label recordings featuring Bobby Hutcherson and Woody Shaw. George Russell was no longer able to keep his sextet together as a working or recording ensemble. Paul Bley with two Savoy recordings was developing a direction beyond Bill Evans that assimilated the aesthetics of Ornette.
    In walked Andrew. Although his music had melody, harmony and rhythm, his conception of each was so unique that he was categorized with the avant garde. This music was avant garde in the strictest sense of the term, but it was anything but free form. As Monk was lumped into the bebop movement because he was there, so was Andrew put into the freedom bag. His music was free of cliché, but that was about the extent of it.

    ~ Michael Cuscuna: Andrew Hill (March 1995), Liner Notes zu „The Complete Blue Note Andrew Hill Sessions (1963-66)“, Mosaic MD7-161, 1995, p. 3

    Soviel zum Rahmen, in den die (eigentlichen) Anfänge von Hills Musik fallen. Er war nun also 32 Jahre alt und hatte schon viel hinter sich, darunter „name gigs“ wie jene mit Dinah Washington und Kirk, und wie so viele andere auch R&B-Erfahrung. Bis zu sen oben erwähnten beiden Sideman-Aufnahmen mit Woods und Henderson lässt allerdings wenig auf eien so eigene musikalische Welt schliessen, wie sie 1963 plötzlich zu hören war. Alfred Lions Begeisterung ist für mich jedenfalls leicht nachzuvollziehen!

    In einer ersten Probe für Black Fire sass Philly Joe Jones am Schlagzeug! Es existieren anscheinend davon Fotos von Frank Wolff. Cuscuna zitiert in seinen Notes Andrew Hill dazu: „I don’t remember how he got picked for the date, but it was amazing. He really got into the tunes and was dealing with them beautifully. There were scheduling problems and we would keep postponing the date. Bu he didn’t sound like you’d expect. He was wonderful“ (ibid).
    Roy Haynes sass schliesslich auf dem Schlagzeug-Hocker und er ist es, „who made the date“! Sein Spiel ist unglaublich vielfältig, variantenreich, fein und doch dicht, lässt die Musik atmen und swingen… es lohnt sich enorm, einfach mal nur ihm zu lauschen! Dasselbe könnte man auch für Richard Davis sagen – meiner Meinung nach fast immer, wenn er mitspielt – aber in Anbetracht der noch viel tolleren Leistungen von ihm auf kommenden Hill-Alben lass ich das hier mal weg… Davis und Joe Henderson machen ihren Job jedenfalls sehr gut, aber Haynes ist es, der die Session so speziell macht! Er fühlt sich komplett in Hills Musik ein – sehr eindrücklich!

    Der Opener, „Land of Nod“, wird mit einem 12/8 Latin-Beat gespielt, nach dem Intro besteht es aus einer A (8 Takte), A1 (6 Takte) und B (6 Takte) Form. Richard Davis übernimmt am Bass das erste Solo, dann folgt Hill mit dem längsten Solo, gefolgt von einem sehr speziellen Henderson-Solo, in der er die Melodie des Themas aufgreift, die Hill ihm mit seinem „comping“ füttert. Das Schlagzeug-Solo hält sich genau an die Struktur und wird – wie oft in Hills Blue Note-Sessions – von Bass und Piano begleitet.
    „Black Fire“, das Titelstück, ist zuerst im Alternate Take zu hören (wie alle Alternate Takes, die Cuscuna bei diesen frühen Hill-Sessions ausgegraben hat, war auch dieser gemäss Lions Notizen ein Kandidat für die Veröffentlichung). Das Stück lebt von einer tollen, eingängigen Melodie über einem Walzer-Rhythmus, den Haynes mit unglaublicher Leichtigkeit dahintrommelt und stets spannend hält. Die Struktur ist eine 64 Takte lange AABA-Form, die A-Teile bestehen aus jeweils zwei 8-taktigen Teilen. Henderson soliert als erster, sehr rhythmisch. Dann Hill mit zwei Durchgängen, tolle Figuren in der rechten Hand reihend, viel Raum lassend, den Haynes aktiv nutzt. Davis und Haynes tauschen dann im letzten Chorus 16-taktige Soli aus… unbegleitet. Haynes trommelt wunderbar weiter ins abschliessende Thema hinein. Ein grossartiges Stück!
    „Cantarnos“ klingt Spanisch angehaucht, Haynes glänzt wieder mit seiner unglaublich dichten und zugleich äusserst leichten und luftigen Begleitung, die stotternden Latin-Rhythmen, die er unter den Solisten am Laufen hält sind toll… Davis spielt oft nur hohe Pedaltöne, um zwischendurch auch mal kurze Läufe oder tiefe Töne einzustreuen… das gibt dem Stück eine Art statisches Feeling, das aber durch Haynes mehr zu einem Stop-and-Go wird. Davis spielt ein grossartiges, feines Solo, dann am Ende kriegt auch Haynes einen wohlverdienten Chorus. Die Form ist hier übrigens AABA, einigermassen Standard, ausser dass die Bridge eine modulierte Variation von A ist.
    Mit „McNeil Island“ folgt dann die Ballade. Haynes setzt hier aus. Henderson spielt die Melodie, dann folgt Hill mit einem Interlude, dann Henderson über arco Bass, dann Am Ende alle wieder alle drei zusammen.
    „Tired Trade“ ist ein 30-taktiges AABA-Stück (die Bridge ist nur 6 Takte lang), Henderson setzt aus, der Puls hat diese schwebende, fliessende Qualität, wie man sie bei Paul Bley hören konnte in jener Zeit. Chorusse von Davis und Haynes umschliessen Hills vier Durchgänge.
    „Pumpkin“ ist ein sehr tolles Thema, schade, dass nicht weitere Bläser zur Hand waren! Nach 8 Takten Intro folgt das Thema mit seiner AABA-Struktur. Die A-Teile dauern 10 Takte und enthalten zwei Takte in 5/4, was dem Stück zu einem eigenartigen Charakter verhilft. Der Alternate Take folgte auf den Master – Hill ist im Master besser, Henderson spielt im letzten fertiggestellten Take allerdings stärker und sicherer.
    „Subterfuge“ ist noch ein Trio-Stück. Nach einem 4-taktigen Vamp-Intro folgt das 4-taktige A, noch einmal der 4-taktige Vamp, der 4-taktige B-Teil, eine Modulation des Vamp-Intros, ein 4-taktiger C-Teil und noch eine Modulation des Vamp-Intros. Die Soli sind über dieser ganzen Struktur aufgebaut… schon klar, dass da vorgängig Proben nötig waren! Jedenfalls ist dieses Stück das längste des Albums und ganz klar eins der Highlights!
    Zum Abschluss der Session folgte der Re-Take von „Black Fire“. Henderson klingt konventioneller aber auch geschlossener, Hill spielt einen Chorus mehr als im Alternate Take.


    Andrew Hill und Richard Davis bei einer Probe für „Black Fire“ (Photo: Francis Wolff)

    Ich werde übrigens auch in der Folge die Musik chronologisch hören, so, wie sie mir vom Mosaic-Set her vertraut ist. Die Reihenfolge, in der sie auf dem Album zu finden war, kann man ja sonst bei Allmusic oder Discogs oder so nachschauen.

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM: gypsy goes jazz, #133: Revivals in den 90ern und eine Neuheit aus der Romandie - 14.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #7: tba | No Problem Saloon, #29: tba
    #7893657  | PERMALINK

    redbeansandrice

    Registriert seit: 14.08.2009

    Beiträge: 11,718

    gypsy tail wind Auf Von Freemans „After Dark“ spielt Hill Orgel – würde ich gerne hören!
    Hill formte dann ein Trio mit Malachi Favors am Bass und James Slaughter, mit dem er – gemäss Cuscunas Notes im Mosaic-Set – ca. 1959 das Warwick-Album So In Love with the Sound of Andrew Hill einspielte. Das Album versank rasch in Vergessenheit. In den 70ern erschien auf TCB (no relation zum TCB-Label von Drummer Peter Schmidlin, soweit ich weiss) mit Streicher-Overdubs und später bei Fresh Sound auf CD. Es ist kein grosses vergessenes Frühwerk – Hill war erst in den frühen 60ern bereit und reif, seine eigene Musik zu machen. Auf diesem Album hört man ihn mit Standards (Body and Soul, Spring Is Here, Old Devil Moon…) und wenig deutet auf den aussergewöhnlichen Denker, Konzeptionisten, Komponisten und Pianisten hin, zu dem Hill sich in den nächsten Jahren entwickeln sollte.

    die Orgel würd ich auch gern mal hören, auf den späteren BN Sessions spielt er die ja auch gelegentlich, aber viel mehr als eine Art Effektgerät – das kann er damals jawohl nicht getan haben… ein großes vergessenes Frühwerk ist So In Love sicherlich nicht, aber ich find es definitiv interessant… schwer zu beschreiben, aber ich find man hört schon irgendwie einzelne Fetzen von dem was Hill später zu einem genialen Ganzen zusammenfügen sollte… (zum Beispiel diesen Hauch von Exotik, das eine Stück mit den Pauken, subtile „Latin“-Einflüsse… ich find das Album ein spannendes Bindeglied, weil man beginnt zu verstehen, wieweit Hills Wurzeln tatsächlich irgendwie auch in so einer exotischen „Lounge-Musik“ lagen (as opposed to zB Blues oder R&B…)

    (und grad hör ich zum Vergleich „Harold Harris at the Playboy Club“ (link), ein anderes loungiges Jazztrio Album aus dem schwarzen Chicago jener Jahr… und da wird sich keiner wundern, dass sich daraus kein genialer Avantgardist entwickelt hat, ich find das merkt man sofort… auch wenn So In Love nicht soo viel besser ist…)

    und ja, klar ist The Awakening noch besser als Conflict… gibt auch noch im Horace Tapscott Archiv in Los Angeles ein Tape mit Tapscott/Joe Gordon/Jimmy Woods… aber das kann man leider nicht hören…

    --

    .
    #7893659  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 61,836

    redbeansandrice… ein großes vergessenes Frühwerk ist So In Love sicherlich nicht, aber ich find es definitiv interessant… schwer zu beschreiben, aber ich find man hört schon irgendwie einzelne Fetzen von dem was Hill später zu einem genialen Ganzen zusammenfügen sollte… (zum Beispiel diesen Hauch von Exotik, das eine Stück mit den Pauken, subtile „Latin“-Einflüsse… ich find das Album ein spannendes Bindeglied, weil man beginnt zu verstehen, wieweit Hills Wurzeln tatsächlich irgendwie auch in so einer exotischen „Lounge-Musik“ lagen (as opposed to zB Blues oder R&B…)

    Find ich jetzt lustig, dass Du als Latin-Rhythmen-Hasser die Exotik hervorhebst… da würd ich nämlich Ahmad Jamal entgegenhalten, der sowas viel, viel toller gemacht hat und zwar zum Zeitpunkt von „So In Love“ (wenn wir mal von 1959 ausgehen) schon einige Jahre.
    Aber das mit dem Bindeglied ist eine richtige Überlegung. Muhal Richard Abrams hat ja auch mal mit den MJT+3 gespielt… da lässt sich ebenfalls auch nicht ansatzweise etwas über seine spätere Avantgarde-Musik heraushören.

    redbeansandriceund ja, klar ist The Awakening noch besser als Conflict… gibt auch noch im Horace Tapscott Archiv in Los Angeles ein Tape mit Tapscott/Joe Gordon/Jimmy Woods… aber das kann man leider nicht hören…

    Wir müssen endlich mal unser Kalifornien-Threads starten… für mich ist das keineswegs klar, aber das geht hier zuweit vom Thema weg.

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM: gypsy goes jazz, #133: Revivals in den 90ern und eine Neuheit aus der Romandie - 14.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #7: tba | No Problem Saloon, #29: tba
    #7893661  | PERMALINK

    nail75

    Registriert seit: 16.10.2006

    Beiträge: 44,088

    Sehr schön, ein Thread zu Andrew Hill. Ich höre gerade das oben verlinkte letzte Konzert – das ist ganz fantastisch. Ich wusste nicht, dass Hill quasi bis zum Ende noch so wunderbare Konzerte gegeben hat. :sonne:

    --

    Ohne Musik ist alles Leben ein Irrtum.
    #7893663  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 61,836

    nail75Sehr schön, ein Thread zu Andrew Hill. Ich höre gerade das oben verlinkte letzte Konzert – das ist ganz fantastisch. Ich wusste nicht, dass Hill quasi bis zum Ende noch so wunderbare Konzerte gegeben hat. :sonne:

    Es gibt ganz grossartige Live-Mitschnitte, manches in guter Radio-Qualität!
    Auch im Quintett mit Byron Wallen und Jason Yarde (sowie Hébert/McPherson) bzw. im Quartett/Quintett mit Greg Tardy und Charles Tolliver (und Hébert/McPherson).
    Héberts Vorgänger war Scott Colley, McPhersons Vorgänger war Nasheet Waits – er blieb lang genug um die Ankunft Tardys noch mitzuerleben. Und dieser Tardy, von dem ich sonst nur sein eigenes Palmetto-Album „Abundance“ (rec. 2001 mit George Colligan am Piano) kenne, der glänzt in Hills Bands immer wieder mit wunderbaren Soli!
    2001 gab’s zudem mal rasch ein Sextett mit Tardy, Marty Ehrlich und Ron Horton (sowie Hébert/Waits). Diese Gruppe spielte am Jazzfest Berlin (2001-10-31) und wurde am Tag darauf auch noch in Lausanne dokumentiert.

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM: gypsy goes jazz, #133: Revivals in den 90ern und eine Neuheit aus der Romandie - 14.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #7: tba | No Problem Saloon, #29: tba
    #7893665  | PERMALINK

    vorgarten

    Registriert seit: 07.10.2007

    Beiträge: 9,795

    gypsy tail windDavis und Joe Henderson machen ihren Job jedenfalls sehr gut, aber Haynes ist es, der die Session so speziell macht!

    ich mochte BLACK FIRE früher nie so richtig. wahrscheinlich, weil ich mich ihr immer als joe-henderson-fan genähert habe und ihn in diesem konzept zu eingezwängt fand. jetzt habe ich sie gerade nochmal gehört und finde sie toll.
    alles, was du über roy haynes sagst, stimmt – und dazu ist die platte unglaublich abwechslungsreich und dicht. meine frage bleibt aber, ob es hier unbedingt noch einen saxophonisten brauchte.

    im netzt liest man immer wieder, dass menschen die musik von hill „kühl“ im sinne von „akademisch“ finden. ich kann das überhaupt nicht nachvollziehen – natürlich ist das alles sehr komplex geschrieben, aber seine spielweise finde ich immer sehr emotional, wehmütig oft, machnmal dem instrument wie abgerungen, auf bewusste weise nicht-leicht, nicht-virtuos und nicht-elegant.

    --

    #7893667  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 61,836

    vorgartenich mochte BLACK FIRE früher nie so richtig. wahrscheinlich, weil ich mich ihr immer als joe-henderson-fan genähert habe und ihn in diesem konzept zu eingezwängt fand. jetzt habe ich sie gerade nochmal gehört und finde sie toll.
    alles, was du über roy haynes sagst, stimmt – und dazu ist die platte unglaublich abwechslungsreich und dicht. meine frage bleibt aber, ob es hier unbedingt noch einen saxophonisten brauchte.

    im netzt liest man immer wieder, dass menschen die musik von hill „kühl“ im sinne von „akademisch“ finden. ich kann das überhaupt nicht nachvollziehen – natürlich ist das alles sehr komplex geschrieben, aber seine spielweise finde ich immer sehr emotional, wehmütig oft, machnmal dem instrument wie abgerungen, auf bewusste weise nicht-leicht, nicht-virtuos und nicht-elegant.

    Ja, nicht-leicht, nicht-virtuos, nicht-elegant – das ist zwar nicht-eloquent ausgedrückt, aber bringt’s sehr gut auf den Punkt, das empfinde ich auch so!
    Allerdings ist das mit der Virtuosität wohl ein ähnliches Thema wie bei Monk: diese Musik setzt technisch enorme Fähigkeiten voraus – aber das Resultat ist dann nicht perlende Brillanz, sondern verschrobene, „schwierige“ Musik.

    Was Henderson betrifft… seine Alben mit Dorham sind ja vergleichsweise recht konventionell (hard)boppig – dass Hills Musik ihn einzwängt mag sein (er kehrte allerdings in den nächsten Jahren zweimal zurück… mag aber auch an Mangel an Alternativen gelegen haben, Mobley wäre ja kein Option gewesen… oder doch? Kenny Dorham ging ja auch!). Andererseits öffnet Hills Musik Henderson auch Möglichkeiten, die er sonst so nicht hatte – aber vielleicht eben auch nicht gesucht hatte.
    Es scheint ja, dass Henderson sehr klare Vorstellungen hatte davon, was er musikalisch und im Leben wollte und sich das alles sehr gezielt erarbeitet hat – und dann damit auch zufrieden war, wohl ohne sich irgendwie eingeschränkt zu fühlen. Ob er 1963 schon auf diesem Weg war, weiss ich natürlich nicht, aber vom Temperament her mag es schon sein, dass er sich eher eingezwängt gefühlt haben mag, als dass er die neuen Möglichkeiten geschätzt hat – aber das werden wir wohl nie erfahren (oder hat er sich mal irgendwo zur Zusammenarbeit mit Hill geäussert?)

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM: gypsy goes jazz, #133: Revivals in den 90ern und eine Neuheit aus der Romandie - 14.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #7: tba | No Problem Saloon, #29: tba
    #7893669  | PERMALINK

    redbeansandrice

    Registriert seit: 14.08.2009

    Beiträge: 11,718

    gypsy tail windFind ich jetzt lustig, dass Du als Latin-Rhythmen-Hasser die Exotik hervorhebst… da würd ich nämlich Ahmad Jamal entgegenhalten, der sowas viel, viel toller gemacht hat und zwar zum Zeitpunkt von „So In Love“ (wenn wir mal von 1959 ausgehen) schon einige Jahre.
    Aber das mit dem Bindeglied ist eine richtige Überlegung. Muhal Richard Abrams hat ja auch mal mit den MJT+3 gespielt… da lässt sich ebenfalls auch nicht ansatzweise etwas über seine spätere Avantgarde-Musik heraushören.

    :-) ich Latin-rhythmen-hasser? echt? (kann sein, aber ich erinner mich nicht..), aber in der Tat habe ich bei Jamal eine Lücke (schonmal gehört aber nicht genug…) und wo du es sagst, macht das sehr viel Sinn, dass der ähnliche Musik gemacht hat, nur besser…

    wen hätt man statt Joe Henderson nehmen sollen… schwierig, Charlie Rouse hätt ich ja mal lustig gefunden (oder Johnny Griffin…), Warne Marsh, Von Freeman, Charles Lloyd natürlich… endlose Möglichkeiten… dass Henderson auf PoD für Lloyd einsprang sagt irgendwie doch genug…

    --

    .
    #7893671  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 61,836

    redbeansandrice :-) ich Latin-rhythmen-hasser? echt? (kann sein, aber ich erinner mich nicht..), aber in der Tat habe ich bei Jamal eine Lücke (schonmal gehört aber nicht genug…) und wo du es sagst, macht das sehr viel Sinn, dass der ähnliche Musik gemacht hat, nur besser…

    Nun, um genauer zu sein hast Du das wohl eher auf Hardbop-Sachen bezogen, wo mal rasch ein Thema mit einem Bossa-Rhythmus unterlegt wird, während die Soli dann in straightem 4/4 ablaufen…

    redbeansandricewen hätt man statt Joe Henderson nehmen sollen… schwierig, Charlie Rouse hätt ich ja mal lustig gefunden (oder Johnny Griffin…), Warne Marsh, Von Freeman, Charles Lloyd natürlich… endlose Möglichkeiten… dass Henderson auf PoD für Lloyd einsprang sagt irgendwie doch genug…

    Das hab ich mir auch überlegt… Rouse hätte vielleicht gepasst, wer weiss. Griffin, Marsh, Lloyd, Freeman kann ich mir irgendwie alle nicht so vorstellen – die haben überdies alle nicht zur Blue Note Familie gehört, im Gegensatz zu Henderson, der ja über Kenny Dorham reinkam und ein paar Jahre fest dazugehörte. Maupin wäre dann so ab 1966 oder 1967 eine Option gewesen, Farrell taucht auch erst etwa dann auf… wen vergessen wir denn jetzt alles noch? Tyrone Washington? ;-)

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM: gypsy goes jazz, #133: Revivals in den 90ern und eine Neuheit aus der Romandie - 14.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #7: tba | No Problem Saloon, #29: tba
    #7893673  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 61,836

    Fünf Wochen nach der Aufnahme von Black Fire war Hill schon wieder im Studio von Rudy Van Gelder. Das Album, das am 13. Dezember 1963 aufgenommen wurde, erhielt den Titel Smokestack. Es erhielt die Katalog-Nummer BLP 4160, erschien aber erst 1966 (seltsamerweise war es neben Hank Mobleys „Dippin'“ unter den ersten paar Alben, die Liberty herausgab, nachdem es Blue Note gekauft hatte).
    Richard Davis und Roy Haynes sind wieder dabei, das Quartett wird von Eddie Khan vervollständigt. Khan hatte sich in den Jahren zuvor einen Namen gemacht durch sein Spiel mit Jackie McLean, Max Roach und Fddie Hubbard. Zudem hatte er mit Hill auf Joe Hendersons „Our Thing“ mitgespielt. Er übernimmt meist die Anker-Rolle und lässt Davis grossen Raum, die Musik solistisch zu ergänzen. Die Musik ist generell noch ein ganzes Stück komplexer als auf dem Debut-Album.
    Das Titelstück beginnt mit 4 Takten Drums, dann 7 Takte Bass, danach folgt das Thema: A (8 + ( Takte), B (9 + 8 Takte), C (8 Takte), A1 (9 Takte). Die Abschnitte sind sich ähnlich, lösen sich aber jeweils anders auf. Hill soliert über der kompletten Form, spielt drei Durchgänge. Die Soli auf dem Alternate und dem Master Take sind dabei völlig verschieden und beide voll mit frischen Ideen, was bei dieser Musik äusserst bemerkenswert ist!
    In „Wailing Wall“ klingt Hills Spiel nahezu klassisch, darunter treibt Haynes mit raschen Triolen gegen den getragenen 4/4-Puls… Davis spielt anfangs mit dem Bogen, wechselt dann zwischen arco und pizzicato ab. Die Form ist ABCA, wobei C 6 Takte umfässt, die anderen Teile 8-taktig sind. Lion nannte das Stück in seinen Notizen „the tune with bass bowing, crying“ – eine sehr schöne Umschreibung. Sehr dramatische Musik.
    „Ode to Von“ präsentiert Khan als Solisten. Das Stück ist Von Freeman gewidmet, ein einigermassen konventioneller 4/4-Rhythmus prägt das Stück, die Struktur ist allerdings komplex… A (7 Takte + 2 Takte im 6/4), B (4 Takte), C (4 Takte), A (auf 10 Takte ausgedehnt). Hills Spiel ist reich an Energie, Khan soliert solide mit seinem festen Ton, am Ende tauschen Hill und Haynes Fours und Twos. Im folgenden Alternate Take spielen die beiden nur Fours und Hills Solo ist länger.
    Auch vom nächsten Stück, „The Day After“, existieren zwei unmittelbar nacheinander gespielte Takes. Wieder ist der erste zum Master erkürt worden. Das Stück besteht aus 8-taktigen Teilen, die sich als ABABCA zu einer 48-taktigen Form zusammensetzen. Davis begleitet sehr aktiv, Haynes hält sich hier wie über die ganze Session über recht zurück, sein rhythmischer Impetus ist ständig zu spüren, aber nie aufdringlich. Im Alternate Take spielt Hill akkordischer und der Rhythmus wirkt gebrochener, zerklüfteter.
    „Verne“ ist eine wunderschöne Ballade, Hills Frau gewidmet. Eddie Khan spielt hier nicht mit, Richard Davis glänzt um so mehr – grossartig, was er hier spielt! Das Stück beginnt in 3/4 und wechselt in der Bridge und fürs Piano-Solo in 4/4, die Struktur ist ABACA.
    „Not So“ beruht auf einer A-A1-B-Struktur, in der B nur 6 Takte hat. Die Melodie wird zweimal gespielt, dann folgen Davis mit einem, Hill mit fünf und Haynes mit einem Durchlauf. Wieder sind nacheinander zwei Takes eingespielt worden, dieses Mal ist zuerst der Alternate Take entstanden. Im Master gelingt das Zusammenspiel besser und Hills Solo klingt stark nach Monk.
    Zum Abschluss folgt das swingende, bluesige „30 Pier Avenue“, ein 16-taktiges Stück mit einer AB-Struktur. Hill spielt zwei Chorusse, dann folgt Khan mit einem, dann Hill/Davis für einen, wieder zwei von Hill und zum Ende Khan/Haynes für einen.
    Die Session wirkt auf mich insgesamt zwingender, geschlossener als das Debut-Album. Zugleich ist die Musik sperriger, komplexer, an der Oberfläche weniger abwechslungsreich und weniger direkt ansprechend was den Klang der Gruppe betrifft, wenn man aber davon absieht und sich in die Musik versenkt, eintaucht in diese so eigene Klangwelt, dann gehört sie für mich zu den schönsten von Hills Aufnahmen, es gibt sehr viel zu entdecken, die Musik ist facettenreich und enorm atmosphärisch.

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM: gypsy goes jazz, #133: Revivals in den 90ern und eine Neuheit aus der Romandie - 14.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #7: tba | No Problem Saloon, #29: tba
    #7893675  | PERMALINK

    clasjaz

    Registriert seit: 19.03.2010

    Beiträge: 2,003

    Auch von mir einen herzlichen Dank für den Hill-Thread!

    Heute habe ich endlich einmal die „So In Love“ wiedergehört, doch, interessant finde ich das schon, wenn natürlich auch nicht gegen manches spätere Album einzutauschen. Abgesehen davon, dass ich die Verbindung von perlendem Spiel und Staccato-Tönen einfach schätze (auf der Ebene lässt sich wenig begründen), weil es etwa nicht so „manisch“ wie manchmal bei Tatum ist, ja, nicht so virtuos wie bei Tatum; abgesehen davon ist doch schon ein Hill zu hören, der trotz Komplexität Freiräume gibt, für Dialoge vor allem, z. B. mit Slaughter in „Chiconga“.

    Und da trifft dieses Loungige wohl zu – auch wenn es zur Abwechslung mal eine sehr anregende Lounge ist. Das Ganze ist noch sehr linear gespielt, später scheint mir Hill viel mehr und immer „aufschichten“ zu wollen, also vertikal zu spielen, zu komponieren. Vertrackt seltsam scheint mir dabei – vielleicht wird gerade auch das als „kühl“ empfunden –, dass bereits auf „So In Love“ ein Zugleich von federnden Akkorden und deren Aufbrechen in Arpeggien zu hören ist. Es ist noch sehr auf die beiden Hände verteilt, noch zu sehr solistisch vielleicht, dieses Zugleich, das mag sein. Vielleicht ist das auch andererseits der „Trick“: dass die beiden Hände einander kommentieren. Bin sehr gespannt auf die Besprechung der Soloalben!

    --

Ansicht von 15 Beiträgen - 1 bis 15 (von insgesamt 108)

Du musst angemeldet sein, um auf dieses Thema antworten zu können.