Die Trompete im Jazz

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  • #7618637  | PERMALINK

    redbeansandrice

    Registriert seit: 14.08.2009

    Beiträge: 11,831

    hier findest du die Übersicht aller Jazzthreads (Bill Dixon gibt es nur als Sterne-Thread, hätte also nicht gepasst), die meiste Bill Dixon Diskussion ist wohl im Avantgarde:Trompete , aber hier ist doch auch gut – sieht in der tat unterstützenswert aus…

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    #7618639  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 62,156

    … und Warren Smith!
    Nur Tubist Ben Stapp sagt mir nichts.

    Da werde ich mich wohl auch beteiligen, danke für den Hinweis!

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    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM: gypsy goes jazz, #133: Revivals in den 90ern und eine Neuheit aus der Romandie - 14.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #7: tba | No Problem Saloon, #29: tba
    #7618641  | PERMALINK

    clasjaz

    Registriert seit: 19.03.2010

    Beiträge: 2,043

    Da mag ich mich natürlich auch beteiligen. Parker spielt inzwischen auch die Violine? Danke auch von mir für den Link.

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    #7618643  | PERMALINK

    katharsis

    Registriert seit: 05.11.2005

    Beiträge: 1,737

    Haben wir tatsächlich keinen eigenen Thread für Donald Byrd?

    Ich habe neulich beschlossen, meinen Plattenschrank von vorne bis hinten durchzuhören. Da ich immer noch nicht alle meine LP’s zusammen habe, war das erste Byrd-Album, das ich gehört habe „Royal Flush“. Ich muss wirklich sagen, dass mich die Musik darauf ganz besonders gepackt hat und ich mir das Album mehrere Male hintereinander durchgehört habe.

    So wie auf „Free Form“ zeigt sich Byrd hier von seiner besten Seite. So ‚advanced‘ war er nur auf „Kofi“. Das Zusammenspiel der Musiker ist großartig und dieses kontinuierliche Austesten der Hardbop-Grenzen, ohne sie wirklich auszudehnen funktioniert so mühelos. Etwas später habe ich dann „Off to the races“ gehört und endlich einmal für mich festgestellt, warum man Hardbop überdrüssig werden kann. Das ist gute Musik, keine Frage. Gleichzeitig aber so zahnlos und wohlbehütet. Auch McLean vermag da nichts zu reißen und die Rhtyhmusgruppe spielt auf Hochglanz, aber eben ohne abgeplatzten Lack.

    Das für mich persönlich bewegende war jedenfalls, dass ich „Royal Flush“ am Todestag von Byrd rausgekramt habe und ohne davon zu wissen, mehrfach ausgerechnet „Requiem“ gehört habe. Ein Stück für jeden Best-Of-Sampler.

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    "There is a wealth of musical richness in the air if we will only pay attention." Grachan Moncur III
    #7618645  | PERMALINK

    redbeansandrice

    Registriert seit: 14.08.2009

    Beiträge: 11,831

    „Lalle made it clear that his main influences were Jackie McLean and Chet Baker.“

    „Today we are probably better able to listen to Lalle Svensson with more open ears, to appreciate his vital, genuinely improvisatory playing and breathtaking risktaking, his certain harmonic ear, his ability to vary tone and attack and to formulate phrases that are not extended patterns of scales and eighth notes, but individually formed phrases with roots in the music of both King Oliver and Kenny Dorham as well as Don Cherry. “

    „LALLE SVENSSON’s name appeared only scantily in the media during his lifetime and is nowadays nowhere to be found on the well-known Internet search engines.“

    Das dritte traf nicht zu, als ich vor zwei, drei Jahren auf meinem Rechner die Datei lalle_svensson.txt anlegte, jetzt scheint es wieder zu stimmen, daher im folgenden der Inhalt… Diese Mischung von Kenny Dorham Einfluss, King Olivers Urwüchsigkeit und Don Cherrys Offenheit … das hör ich in der Tat auch, viel von seiner Musik kenn ich nicht, zu Bernt Rosengrens Stockholm Dues hab ich mich gelegentlich überschwenglich geäussert, I Should Care unter Svenssons Namen ist aber auch ziemlich großartig…

    hab jetzt nicht nochmal richtig geguckt, aber die Autoren stehen tendentiell unter den Texten…

    LALLE SVENSSON

    In addition to the Nalen dancehall and Sunside youth-center, there were many clubs in Stockholm during the middle and end of the fifties where jazz music was played: Club 2, T-Club, Gazell, South Side, Birdland, Minton, Club Artist and whatever else they were called, followed later by Kurbits, Bobbadilla, Storken, Artibus („Greta’s“) and others. There was also the brothers Aften’s famous B.R.A. Studio, in the Old Town on Lilla Nygatan, that could be rented by the hour. It has to be said too that most of the spaces for playing were located in cellars below the Old Town and at bomb shelters in Tegnerlunden, Hjorthagen, etc. Young men congregated in these places, most of them still teenagers who had heard Parker and Miles and Rollins and Coltrane and Monk, and the most important thing in life for them was to play their music: Bernt Rosengren, Lasse Werner, Bosse Skoglund, Lennart Jansson, Conny Lundin, Bosse Wärmell, Eje Thelin, Christer Fryklöf, Lalle Svensson….. „Lalle was the enormously talented,“ says Bernt Rosengren today, „perhaps the most talented of us all.“

    Sten Magnus „Lalle“ Svensson started playing piano as a five year old, and when he was ten he received trumpet lessons from Nisse Skoog. He was called a musical wonder at home in Djursholm and always had the highest marks for singing and music. His school teacher in preparatory school wrote a poem: „Lalle with the golden yellow mane, he laughs and smiles when he for the children plays.“ Music was joy. Lalle’s life pretty much followed a classic tragic-romantic curve thereafter. He was a true and genuine musician who never made an exhibition of his musicianship, an outstanding talent who bloomed for a decade or so and then gradually withered during a couple of decades of diminishing public interest and increasing personal and social difficulties. Even during his best years he wasn’t appreciated by the public and critics in measure to his worth. This appreciation came, as is so often the case, long afterwards.

    He was first spoken of as the 12-year old trombonist with the Dallas Dixieland Band in Djursholm and as the 15-year old in the Trombone Brothers, alongside Lambert Asker. When Lalle’s family moved to Danderyd he met Eje Thelin and, in this way, became a member of the Pygmé Jazzband as pianist and participated in two 78-rpm discs for Philips. Lalle later often expressed his gratitude for having had his first jazz experience in dixieland music, with its basic simplicity. Throughout later years you could often hear formulations in his playing that were pure dixie. In the beginning and middle of the fifties Lalle made hay with all the orchestral competitions that were common in dixieland as well as modernist styles. There’s probably no one who received as many soloist prizes as he did.

    In 1955, the J&K-styled (Jay Jay Johnson & Kai Winding) modern group that Lalle and Eje Thelin led won the (now defunct) Aftontidningen evening newspaper’s annual AT-Jazz competition for amateur groups. Lalle’s instrument was now valve-trombone, which he continued to play for the next five years. He toured with a number of bands: Henning Hendrix, Sven Bollhem with Carli Tornehave, Gösta Arnold, Almstedt-Lind, and others. For a couple of years he was a member of saxophonist Bertil Löfdahl’s Quintet. This was a stimulating period with a good deal of jazz and plenty of gigs. There was also often a demand for musical entertainment by a pianist and this fell to Lalle’s lot. He was a member of Kurt Lindgren’s ambitious group, with Bosse Wärmell, he jammed a lot at Nalen and in all the multitudinous cellar clubs. Then, almost overnight, the jazz musicians were squeezed out of the folkparks by artists in a new fashion like Rock-Ragge, Rock-Olga, Little Gerard, and others. Jazz musicians such as Christer Boustedt and Börje Frederiksson tried for a while to compromise with this state of affairs, but it soon became clear that this wasn’t going to work. Lalle, for his part, took his trumpet and left for Paris.

    He obtained work at the Chat Qui Pêche club with Belgian alto saxophonist Jacques Pelzer and played with American stars such as Charles Mingus, Bud Powell, Chet Baker (who became a close friend) and worked with the beat writer William Burroughs. He turned up in Stockholm once in a while and played with his old buddies, and with others recently arrived in the city. Two such newcomers, Lars Sjösten and Björn Alke, became Lalle’s lifelong friends.
    Then it was to Paris again, a city and a life that Lalle loved and where he could find gigs. Living was still relatively easy for a talent like Lalle. There was an audience for the music and significant Americans artists to be challenged. Kenny Drew, Sonny Criss and Jackie McLean were a few of these, and he became member of a group that ws called the International Jazz Quintet with vibraphonist Karl Berger and bassist Peter Trunk.

    In 1964 Lalle returned to Sweden for good and started to play with Bernt Rosengren’s quintet, something he had long aimed to do. The same year this band undertook an adventurous trip to Czechoslovakia for three months and played in hotels, restaurants, theaters, clubs, schools and for the radio. In Bratislava, Lalle took part in a May 1st demonstration march, where he had spontaneously joined up with a medical doctors‘ section. Wearing dark shades and with a Soviet flag in his hand he suddenly appeared on television, introducing himself as „Doctor Lalle Svensson aus Schweden……….“

    Lalle was a spontaneous and original human being, who could be crazily surprising privately as well in his music. One had to be prepared for unexpected daredevil escapades, flashes of wit and sallies that weren’t always appreciated by the world at large. But it wasn’t apparent to most people that he was an extremely sensitive human being. He was one of my closest friends, and we had daily contact for upwards of twenty years. Many times I became aware of tears starting to trickle down his face, apparently without any reason. He was as honest and direct as a child and quite unable to pretend, often to his own disadvantage. He saw straight through bullshit and axed it promptly.

    Lalle was active in a pistol club for many years, participating in competitions and winning several prizes and medals. Other enthusiasms were model aeroplanes and speedboats and he enjoyed inordinately such hippie comic-strips as The Freak Brothers and Fat Freddy’s Cat. He’d a great sense of humor and a lively intellect and could express himself wittily in several languages and dialects. Lalle was attracted to the lower echelons of society and could sit for days on end on benches in parks and squares chattering to drunks and deadbeats. He sometimes went to a free church on Stockholm’s Southside and was very keen to sing and play John Sparring’s hit song „O Store Gud“ („Oh great God“) on his next recording. But the driving licence he succeeded to obtaining at the beginning of the eighties became merely a brief parenthesis………

    In 1965, the Bernt Rosengren Quintet recorded „Stockholm Dues“(EMI), where Lalle plays brilliantly. This LP was awarded the year’s Golden Record prize. The material was later reissued on CD and, particularly on the added track, „When I Fall in Love“, Lalle’s playing is outstanding. In 1967, Bernt played in Denmark for a lengthy period, and when he returned he and Lalle continued together for a further spell. But the music had started to develop in new directions where Lalle didn’t always feel at home, „So I gradually eased myself out.“.

    With the approval of the authorities, the legal prescriptions for drugs had commenced a few years earlier. Lalle, who’d been in touch with drugs already in Paris, was included. He survived, as opposed to friends such as pianist Allan Wajda and too many others. But he continued to live on a knife edge for the rest of his life, prescribed methadone which functioned as any other life-sustaining medication. But this bound him by a noose to doctors and chemist shops, and he found increasing difficulty in managing his cooking, cleaning and domestic chores. Consequently, a great talent who only wanted to play and sing beautifully, have fun and take the whole world in his arms, gradually transmogrified into an original, an oddball. Nevertheless, many of the younger musicians today bear witness to the significance of his helpfulness, his good advice and his encouragement. Above all he stressed the importance of giving one’s solos a clear form and varying the phrasing. He was especially careful about the need for „passing on the baton neatly“.

    During summer 1969 he participated in Lars Gullin’s „Live!“ (EMI), featuring lyrical playing in the four numbers that were recorded at Theater Narren in the Gröna Lund tivoli – the very same night Neil Armstrong landed on the moon – with an unusual setting of trumpet, tenor sax, baritone sax and acoustic bass: Lalle, Rosengren, Gullin, Torbjörn Hultcrantz. Nannie Porres‘ first album under her own name, „I thought about you“ (EMI), appeared in 1971 and Lalle’s solo in the title number has become vouchsafed „legendary“ and wished upon by all manner of interpretations and poetic descriptions. In the public eye and in that of the critical fraternity, Lalle is at just about this point in time transformed into a being other than an everyday jazz musician, nonetheless unique. He picked up the label as a kind of „tattered genius“ which was to follow him the rest of his life. The elements of „romantic tragedy“ now make an entry. Two further Nannie Porres LPs subsequently appeared, „Närbild / Closeup“ („Golden Record“ 1976), and „Kärlekens ögon / Eyes of Love“ (both EMI), where Lalle plays a fine solo on each of them.

    In 1970 he was present for the LP „Orangutang!“ (EMI) by my orchestra, G.L. Unit, and later in Nisse Sandström’s debut LP, „The Painter“ (EMI) („Golden Record“ 1972). And in 1974 there was the LP „Cockroach Road“ for Lalle’s own label, Cockroach Records, paid for by his faithful parents. „I felt I must do something. Bernt had his group, Björn Alke had his and so did Lasse Sjösten. I began to hang out at Bernt’s rehearsal room in Stadsgården to practice trumpet again after several years of dental problems, and I had a great deal of encouragement from Maffy Falay who practiced together with me and helped me a lot.“ The disc was rewarded by a four-star rating in Orkester Journalen and won, by a large margin, the listeners‘ section of the poll for the Golden Record. The LP sleeve included a meaty but not too easily read four-page text, „The Life and Times of Lalle Svensson“, an interview by Keith Knox which attracted much attention.
    During the 1960s Lalle also began to devote himself to painting. On the cover of „Cockroach Road“ there is a reproduction of a large work of art painted on the living room wall of his apartment and photographed before the apartment was renovated. His second LP, „The Unique Lalle Svensson“ (EMI) came in 1978. This too was rewarded with four stars in Orkester Journalen and comprised a repertoire of favorite evergreens, bop, blues, and Swedish music by Evert Taube, for groups ranging from a quartet to a string orchestra. Not least, Lalle’s versions for piano and vocal of a blues and the psalm, „Tryggare kan ingen vara / Safer Can No Child Be“) gained a whole lot of attention. In 1987, three years before his death, the LP „Cockroach Moods“ was released, again on Lalle’s own label. This was recorded at Red Mitchell’s home with Åke Johansson on piano, Red on bass and Rune Carlsson on drums. There isn’t much left of Lalle’s trumpet technique by this time, but in his Orkester Journalen review, Christian Munthe speaks nevertheless of, „a music that bears witness to an intensive love of the jazz tradition and at the same time a burning will to, from that springboard, expose his innermost feelings for the listener, ……fragile, soft and at the same time, white-hot intensive tones….a disc for those who enjoy more traditional jazz with a strongly personal charge, but which is at the same time open towards unorthodox means of expression.“

    But now to the music on Amigo AMCD 886, „I Should Care“. This CD exhibits Lalle Svensson to us when he was at his best, both musically and technically. Already at the age of 22 he was playing with an impressive certainty and was absolutely at home with the idiom. Ingmar Glanzelius has also said that, „Lalle is one of the few Swedes who has succeeded in getting under the skin of this special music and not merely mimic its outer form.“
    The recording of „I Should Care“ is taken from a Barclay LP that was issued with music from the first big Antibes Jazz Festival in 1960. Pianist Joel Vandroogenbroeck was a few years later a part of Eje Thelin’s Quintet. Jacques Pelzer (1924-94) was a friend and colleague who Lalle held in high esteem; as late as the beginning of the 1980s they had common plans to work together in Europe.

    When the jazz musicians lost their job opportunities as dance musicians around 1960, and yet hadn’t found a place a place in the cultural life, we realized that if something was going to happen we would have to organize it ourselves. We started the association, Emanon, later followed by the association, Modus, and the association for Swedish Jazz Musicians, FSJ. We initiated this endeavor with a concert series in the Museum of Modern Art in Stockholm, and the next two tracks on the record are from the first concert there. Even if we had several very talented musicians among our number, it was in some way natural that the whole thing should start with Bernt Rosengren, who through all the years has been an incomparable driving force and source of inspiration.

    This quintet is classic. Claes-Göran Fagerstedt’s piano introduction immediately changes one’s mood for the better and so does Bernt’s sparklingly vital playing. Sune Spångberg is one of the swingiest drummers Sweden has had, and with Torbjörn Hultcrantz’s rhythmically and harmonically deep heart beats and „Fager’s“ uniquely driving characteristic accompaniment and solo playing, the whole thing lifts to great heights.

    It’s evident in every number how Lalle is his own man. Bernt Rosengren´s incredible authority makes him neither hesitant nor competitive. He plays his own music in an ideal framework and creates solos that are outstandingly personal, surprising and alive. „The Sound of Surprise“, that mark of nobility in jazz, is to be found abundantly in the work of Lalle Svensson. Maffy Falay, himself a master musician who knows what he’s talking about, has said that, „Lalle is the best jazz trumpet player in Sweden.“ Maybe we will never experience any such individual and original jazz musician again. At that time we had vital contact with the sources of jazz: „everybody“ was still alive. From Louis Armstrong and Lester and Ellington to Mingus, Coltrane and Cecil Taylor; they all came here to Sweden to play. There were no schools where you could learn to play jazz with academic methodology, one had to find one’s own way. (There is no value judgement attached to this statement of the facts; time does not stand still, studying is never wrong, and whatever one makes of it is still a personal matter.)

    In a couple of the following numbers Bernt also plays alto saxophone, an instrument he’d bought just a week before the recording. Here the other rhythm group that Bernt used at this time was playing. The formidable Leif Wennerström will also appear a bit later, he has remained Bernt’s drummer since then.

    Lalle never hesitated about his identity as a musician, and one could be many times taken aback by his gifts – as when in later years he could sit down at the piano and „improvise Bach“ or play and sing some standard tune with a wonderful interpretation and feeling. He was also quite clear that there would probably be records made with his material after his death and he very carefully entrusted to me the recordings he’d gathered to look after.
    During the years that this record covers, Lalle was more blamed than praised, contrary to what obtained later. Which is upside down from what it should have been as a matter of fact. It was said that he couldn’t play trumpet, that he didn’t have any technique, that he slurred and missed, etc. Lalle himself stressed that his style was consciously wrought, that he wanted to keep the trombone/valve-trombone character on trumpet and that he liked to use gliding transitions between the notes instead of the attack one usually hears from trumpeters, a kind of Coltrane-ish „sheets of sound“ approach.

    Today we are probably better able to listen to Lalle Svensson with more open ears, to appreciate his vital, genuinely improvisatory playing and breathtaking risktaking, his certain harmonic ear, his ability to vary tone and attack and to formulate phrases that are not extended patterns of scales and eighth notes, but individually formed phrases with roots in the music of both King Oliver and Kenny Dorham as well as Don Cherry.

    Gunnar Lindqvist

    (Translation from the Swedish by Keith and Ingrid Knox)

    För den som vill läsa mer om Lalle Svensson rekommenderas bl.a.:

    „Att lyssna på musik“ Johnny Olsson, Nya Wermlands Tidningen, 29 april 1975.

    „En udda spelman“ Lars Westin, Orkester Journalen nr. 12/1975.

    „En trumpetares död. Spåren efter Lalle Svensson“ Anders Sundelin, Dagens Nyheter, 2 mars 1997.

    Remembering Lalle…

    LALLE’s registered name was Sten Magnus Svensson. However, his true moniker since child-hood was and still is Lalle (meaning something like ”he who hums”) in the hearts of his friends here in Stockholm as well as in Paris, where he was blessed with apprecation of a more obvious and generous kind than in his native country. To some of us up here though, the man was somehow one with his music; likewise to his friends Chet Baker, sailing all relaxed these days on lyrical wings in evergreen heaven, and just as surely to Jackie McLean, now a university professor in the US having reached 70, who just like Chet and Lalle is a musician in all the main ways of his being. When in the beginning of the 60s they met in some street of the Quartier Latin in Paris, the lingo exchange might have sounded something like this:

    ”Lall-le!” – ”Ah, Jackie…” – ”Yeah man… Lall-leh…” – ”Cool. See you tonight eh?” – ”Of course. Man, your horn last night… but now you go get yourself one wheel-barrow of a wheel-barrow and bring a baby grand au Chat-Qui-Pêche tonight and play me some mean piano too… Heh heh…” – ”Heh heh. Easy… Well man, see you then…” – ”Cool. We’ll play some.”

    I just stood there thinking the whole scene was music, full of pregnant meanings. And somehow it was. Such was the case with Lalle most of the time, whether the music was lyrical, drastically tragic and playfully adventerous at the same time, or like Lalle himself, impregnated with a childishness bordering on infancy, although as inescapably raw and in the nude; and somehow deep down there was a laconically upright stature fueling the notes, that belonged somewhere far beyond our sometimes rather absurd everyday lives.

    In early summer of the year when Lalle was to pass on, we used to go strolling around town if there was sunshine or light rain. Somewhere within, part of Lalle somehow knew that it would soon be time, but he kept observing people with a keen eye and wonder at little details around us, and at the very existence of the present, with the openminded confidence of someone who soon would be travelling on, who in a sense already had, without fuss or drama, as the music never would come to an end anyway. When a couple of weeks later he was lying in his hospital bed, dying slowly and quietly, he was hardly conscious; but when some beautiful nurse entered the room, his face opened up, eyes still closed, into a slightly mischievously amused and contented shadow of a smile; and I thought I heard a few notes out of ”I Should Care”.

    Einar Hecksher

    LALLE SVENSSON

    LALLE SVENSSON’s name appeared only scantily in the media during his lifetime and is nowadays nowhere to be found on the well-known Internet search engines. It is high time then for a discerning exposé to be made available exhibiting the best efforts of this highly original trumpeter.

    Lalle was born August 16th, 1938, and came up as a dixieland pianist and trombonist with the Pygmé Jazzband in the Stockholm suburbs. In 1956 this group made the change to modern jazz and became the Eje Thelin Quintet, featuring a two-trombone front line of Eje Thelin playing slide and Lalle playing valve-trombone, backed by the great Conny Lundin on bass. It was during this period that Lalle came under the wing of pianist Claes-Göran Fagerstedt, who taught him a lot about jazz.

    During 1957, tenorist Bernt Rosengren and trumpeter Lalle Svensson both became members of a band that accompanied Don Byas for a Swedish tour and, from that point forward, Bernt and Lalle worked together often. For around six months, Lalle worked alongside tenorist Bosse Wärmell and altoist Rolf Hultkvist in bassist Kurt Lindgren’s highly adventurous quintet, a group that unfortunately never recorded. Lalle departed the Lindgren quintet in April 1960 and traveled to Paris. There he met Nicaraguan drummer, Donald Brown, who befriended him and fixed him a festival job with the Jacques Pelzer All Stars at Juan-Les-Pins, from where “I Should Care” was recorded. Charles Mingus’s group also played at Juan-Les-Pins that same year and Lalle indicated he jammed with them. It is more than likely that Donald Brown introduced Lalle to many of the famous jazz artists with whom he subsequently worked, in Paris and elsewhere, including Sonny Criss, Kenny Drew, Jackie McLean, Larry Ritchie (from “The Connection”), Jean-Luc Ponty, Bud Powell, Peter Littman and Chet Baker. Lalle made it clear that his main influences were Jackie McLean and Chet Baker. Baker used Lalle mostly as a pianist in the beginning, but then many nights René Urtrèger was the pianist so that Chet Baker and Lalle both played trumpet and Baker sang.

    When Bernt Rosengren came to Paris in 1962 on his honeymoon, Lalle and he formed an international quintet, with Joel Vandroogenbroeck on piano. In 1963, Bud Powell was at the Chat qui Pêche and Lalle played with him on quite a number of occasions. Lalle continued to be based in Paris until 1964, although he had visited Stockholm a couple of times each year. The Emanon concert from October 1963 by the Bernt Rosengren Quintet was recorded during one of these trips. Initially as a duo, Bernt and Lalle started to get gigs during early 1964 and then put a quintet together, which was highly regarded during its three years or so of existence. Tours were made in Norway, Denmark and Czechoslovakia; the last being a three-month tour that expired chaotically in Paris. Titles #4 through #9 are by this group, albeit with a few changes in the rhythm department, including Swedish Radio’s broadcast from September 1964 and a location recording from the Golden Circle jazz club in February 1967. The quintet also recorded for EMI under Bernt Rosengren’s name (“Stockholm Dues”, reissued on compact disc in 1985, since then deleted) and the disc became voted ‘Best jazz record of 1965’ by readers of Orkester Journalen magazine.

    From 1967 Lalle played less and less with Bernt Rosengren’s group as tenorist Tommy Koverhult came in and eventually replaced him. From about 1968 Lalle appeared rather little for club sessions, although he still had his close friends among the musicians and he did participate in a number of recordings as a sideman. These included Lars Gullin’s “Live” (EMI) from 1969, Gunnar Lindqvist’s Unit “Orangutang” (EMI) from 1970, Nannie Porres’ “I Thought About You” (EMI) from 1971, and Nisse Sandström’s “The Painter” (EMI) from 1972.

    In 1973 Lalle spent a good deal of time with his dentist, but he was getting ready for a comeback. In May 1974 Lalle made his first session under his own name, “Cockroach Road” (Cockroach Records), an LP that featured a remarkable painting by Lalle on its front cover and included a 25,000-word insert, “The Life and Times of Lalle Svensson”, written by the undersigned.
    With the help of his long-time friend, EMI producer Gunnar Lindqvist, Lalle made a further couple of sessions during the 1980s. But the sands of time were soon running out for Lalle and in Stockholm on September 22nd, 1990, he died.

    My estimation of Lalle’s trumpet playing on his “Cockroach Road” album seems germane also to this, his finest release to date. Lalle is an outrageous original, original to the point of uniqueness! Listen to Lalle dancing serenely amid the terrors and sacrifical flames of his world and ours, with a sensitivity so extreme as to be almost tangible. The poignant lyricism of his lines suffuses fragments of old songs. Lalle’s trumpet playing has a good deal of trombone technique woven into it and the smears and glisses are often surprising. Trumpet wasn’t designed for this and the technical difficulties are formidable. Lalle’s feeling for harmony is extraordinary, he’s fiendishly musical and aims just for the notes he needs. There may be an occasional miss, but the feeling is always there accurately mirroring his intentions. Lalle pitches a note in tune and the sound is divine. When a note seems unusual, know only that it’s supposed to be that way. Music is an act of courage and such honesty in music is rare.

    Keith Knox

    Lalle Svensson – Discography

    Lalle Svensson
    Cockroach Road / Cockroach Records / CLP-101 / 1974 LP

    Lalle Svensson
    The Unique Lalle Svensson / EMI 7C 062-35560 / 1978 LP

    Lalle Svensson
    Cockroach Moods / Cockroach Records CLP-102 / 1986 LP

    Pygmé Jazzband
    Pygmé Jazzband/ Philips P 50094 H / 1955 78 rpm
    Pygmé Jazzband
    Pygmé Jazzband/ Philips P 50095 H / 1955 78 rpm

    Eje Thelin Quartet
    Jazz för ungdom Vol.2 / Karusell KSEP 3034 / 1956 EP

    Jacques Pelzer All Stars a o
    Antibes Festival 1960 / Barclay 84.081 / 1960 LP

    Bernt Rosengren
    Stockholm Dues / Columbia SSX 1013, Odeon 054-34844 / 1965 LP / EMI 7924282 CD Reissue

    Lars Gullin
    Live! / EMI 4E 062-34045 / 1969 LP

    G.L. Unit
    Orangutang! / Odeon 4E 062-34163 / 1969-70 LP

    Nannie Porres
    I Thought About You / Odeon 4E 062-34336 / 1971 LP

    Nils Sandström
    The Painter / Odeon 4E 062-34659 / 1972 LP / EMI CD Reissue

    Nannie Porres
    Närbild / EMI 7C 062-35293 / 1976 LP

    Nannie Porres
    Kärlekens Ögon / EMI 062-35449 / 1977 LP

    Lalle Svensson
    I Should Care / Amigo AMCD 886/ 1999 CD

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    #7618647  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 62,156

    Danke! Noch nie von ihm gehört … hier die etwas zurechtformatierten Details aus der Swedish Jazz Discography zu seinen Leader-Sessions:

    LALLE SVENSSON

    LALLE SVENSSON / I SHOULD CARE (Amigo)
    Jacques Pelzer Quintet: Lalle Svensson tp, Jacques Pelzer as, Joel Vandroogenbroeck p, Benoit Quersin b, Donald Brown dr.
    Antibes-Juan les Pins Festival, France, July 13, 1960
    I SHOULD CARE / THEME FOR ERNIE Barclay 84081, Amigo AMCD 886
    Barclay 84081 as PREMIER FESTIVAL EUROPEEN DU JAZZ-ANTIBES-JUAN LES PINS 1960.
    Other titles from this CD, see Bernt Rosengren.

    COCKROACH ROAD
    Lalle Svensson, Maffy Falay tp, Tommy Koverhult as, Bernt Rosengren ts, Lennart Jansson bars, Claes Göran Fagerstedtp, Torbjörn Hultcrantz, Björn Alke b, Bo Skoglund dr.
    May 6, 1974
    DANSEN PÅ SUNNANÖ (E.Taube) Cock CLP101
    COCKROACH ROAD (LS) —
    Omit Maffy Falay, Tommy Koverhult, Lennart Jansson.
    ‘ROUND MIDNIGHT —
    Lalle Svensson tp, Lars Sjösten p, Torbjörn Hultcrantz b, Björn Alke b, Bo Skoglund dr.
    I’M OLDFASHIONED Cock CLP101
    Add Bernt Rosengren ts.
    I SHOULD CARE —

    THE UNIQUE
    Lalle Svensson tp, Lars Sjösten p, Torbjörn Hultcrantz b, Leif Wennerström dr, Nannie Porres vo.
    Apr 13, 1978
    I REMEMBER CIFFORD (np) EMI 062-35560
    Add Björn Rosengren ts.
    FOR ALL WE KNOW (np) —
    EARLY MORNING BLUES (LS) —
    Lalle Svensson tp, Bernt Rosengren, Tommy Koverhult fl, Lars Sjösten p, Torbjörn Hultcrantz b, Leif Wennerström dr, 10 strings.
    FALLIN’ IN LOVE WITH LOVE EMI 062-35560
    Omit Koverhult.
    BE MY LOVE —
    Apr 14, 1978
    Add Tommy Koverhult fl.
    ÄLSKLIGA BLOMMOR SMÅ (E.Taube) EMI 062-35560
    Lalle Svensson tp, Nicke Johansson p, Torbjörn Hultcrantz b, Leif Wennerström dr.
    LA RONDE DE L’AMOUR EMI 062-35560
    Apr 17, 1978
    Lalle Svensson tp, Åke Johansson p, Björn Alke b, Rune Carlsson dr.
    STRUTTIN’ WITH SOME BARBECUE
    MINOR D (LS) —
    THIS IS NO LAUGHING MATTER —
    GEORGIA ON MY MIND —
    Lalle Svensson p vo.
    July 18, 1978
    TRYGGARE KAN INGEN VARA EMI 062-35560
    HUMMIN’ THE BLUES (LS) —

    COCKROACH MOODS
    Lalle Svensson tp, Åke Johansson p, Red Mitchell b.
    Nov 8, 1986
    KOFTAN (LS) Cockroach CLP102
    THE SUN AND THE WATER (RM) —
    COCKROACH RIVER (LS) —
    THIS IS NO LAUGHING MATTER —
    I CAN’T GET STARTED —
    Add Rune Carlsson dr.
    Nov 9, 1986
    ALL THE THINGS YOU ARE —
    I SHOULD CARE —
    IF YOU COULD SEE ME NOW —
    WOOFIN’ AND TWEETIN’ —
    LOPPIS (LS) —
    Lalle Svensson vo elp.
    Mar 17, 1987
    VARFÖR SKOLA MÄNSKOR STRIDA (H. P. Danks / E.Norlander) —

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM: gypsy goes jazz, #133: Revivals in den 90ern und eine Neuheit aus der Romandie - 14.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #7: tba | No Problem Saloon, #29: tba
    #7618649  | PERMALINK

    redbeansandrice

    Registriert seit: 14.08.2009

    Beiträge: 11,831

    grad nochmal gelesen, weiss schon, warum ich das gespeichert hatte, Elvis und die Beatles sind was sie sind, aber das hier muss echt deprimierend gewesen sein:

    „Then, almost overnight, the jazz musicians were squeezed out of the folkparks by artists in a new fashion like Rock-Ragge, Rock-Olga, Little Gerard, and others.“

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdR-CdQsNDg

    --

    .
    #7618651  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 62,156


    (photo: Lindsay Beyerstein)

    Laurie Frink (1951-2013)

    http://kimmacari.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/laurie-frink/

    Ich kenne sie aus der Big Band von Maria Schneider und schätze ihre Beiträge sehr. Sie wirkte auch in den Big Bands von Andrew Hill mit (A Beautiful Day, Palmetto) und Satoko Fuji mit, war aber schon viel länger unterwegs.
    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laurie_Frink

    Dave Douglas schrieb in seinem Blog von ein paar Jahren ein paar Zeilen über sie, darunter auch die Folgenden:

    Laurie has been my trumpet teacher for over a decade, and I know many other trumpeters who rely on her for advice and counsel. She is the kind of gifted teacher who takes a personal interest in her students, crafting exercises specifically to their needs. She has also made herself available in emergencies — I once called her for advice from Zurich, in panic on the day of a recording session. She called right back and listened to me play over the phone. She gave me several exercises to do to work out the issues. Something about it really clicked, though I would be hard pressed to tell you how… I did go into the studio with Tiny Bell Trio that day to record Constellations.

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM: gypsy goes jazz, #133: Revivals in den 90ern und eine Neuheit aus der Romandie - 14.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #7: tba | No Problem Saloon, #29: tba
    #7618653  | PERMALINK

    asdfjkloe

    Registriert seit: 07.07.2006

    Beiträge: 5,764

    Auch hier führte mich die Auflistung resümierend zurück in die Vergangenheit und zu Gedanken bezüglich dieser live erlebten Trompeter:

    Maynard Ferguson
    Freddie Hubbard
    Charles Tolliver
    Woody Shaw
    Clark Terry
    Lester Bowie
    Tomasz Stanko
    Jack Walrath
    Hannibal Marvin Peterson
    Palle Mikkelborg
    Ack van Rooyen
    Matthias Eick
    Valery Ponomarev
    Benny Bailey
    Lew Soloff
    Til Brönner

    Meine, hier auch aus dem Bauch heraus gefühlten, Lieblingsstars der Trompete sind:

    Dizzy Gillespie
    Miles Davis
    Clifford Brown
    Lee Morgan
    Chet Baker
    Hannibal Marvin Peterson
    Valery Ponomarev

    --

    #7618655  | PERMALINK

    captain-kidd

    Registriert seit: 06.11.2002

    Beiträge: 4,140

    Bei mir letztlich:

    Anfang und Ende sind für mich das Schönste, was es je auf der Trompete gab. Ich liebe Louis – und verzeihe ihm sogar seine späteren Schlager…

    --

    Do you believe in Rock n Roll?
    #7618657  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 62,156

    Hier trägt meine Live-Liste noch weniger weit als bei den Tenorsaxphonisten:

    Benny Bailey (mit Unmgengen Charme)
    Randy Brecker (mit Kompressor unter dem Jackett)
    Bobby Bradford (unvergleichlich! fragil sitzend inmitten einer im Halbreis stehenden, wilden Free Jazz-Kapelle, aber die Projektionskraft seines Kornetts überstrahlte alles!)
    Herb Robertson (auch mit Kompressor, aber Musik kam dennoch raus)
    Tom Harrell (zweimal, sehr berührend)
    Tomasz Stanko (hipper Existentialismus)
    Roy Campbell (two feet in the gutter!)
    Taylor Ho Bynum (one foot … eindrücklicher Kerl!)
    Markus Stockhausen (yeah!)
    Matthieu Michel (wundervoller Ton!)
    Steven Bernstein (lounge for young moderns)
    Dave Douglas (oder über die gute Seele)
    Russ Johnson (noch ein wundervoller Ton!)

    Es waren gewiss noch mehr … in Big Bands auch Laurie Frinck, Ingrid Jensen, Thomas Gansch etc.)

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM: gypsy goes jazz, #133: Revivals in den 90ern und eine Neuheit aus der Romandie - 14.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #7: tba | No Problem Saloon, #29: tba
    #7618659  | PERMALINK

    udw
    so little gets done

    Registriert seit: 22.06.2005

    Beiträge: 3,284

    Mich würde interessieren, wie Eure Meinungen zu Matthew Halsall, einem jungen Trompeter aus Manchester, sind.
    Die letzten beiden Tage laufen bei mir „Colour Yes“ und „Fletcher Moss Park“. Beide gefallen mir (erstere mehr), lassen mich aber auch etwas ratlos zurück. Sollte man wirklich in diesem Jahrtausend noch so dermaßen nach Coltrane klingen (noch dazu wie eine Symbiose aus dem klassischen Quartett und vor allem dem späteren Quintett)? Wird hier Jazz nur verwaltet? Andererseits sind viele der Tracks wirklich schön (vor allem die Harfe gefällt mir).

    --

    so little is fun
    #7618661  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 62,156

    Matthew Halsall? Noch nie gehört … gerade lief The Sun in September – beim Flötensolo habe ich irgendwann die Geduld verloren … da lege ich lieber Hariprasad Chaurasia ein – wenn ich indische Flöte hören will, dann lieber richtig! Das Trompetensolo … nun, der Ton ist hübsch, aber die Musik ist insgesamt definitiv nicht für mich gemacht (oder ich nicht für diese Musik), ich verstehe das zwar irgendwie, will auch überhaupt nicht sagen, es sei schlecht, aber mir ist das zu lieblich – ich mag nicht mal sagen melancholisch, denn Melancholie wäre ein stärkeres Gefühl, als ich hier höre, das zieht eher – leicht filmisch – an mir vobei.

    Jetzt läuft das hier:

    Das gefällt mir wesentlich besser, aber ich höre irgendwie nicht, was dahinter steckt.

    Jetzt bin ich noch hier:

    Ich höre das Ganze irgendwie eher als Off-Shoot der ganzen UK Acid Jazz-Scene … ich will nicht zu böse sein, aber mir wirkt das etwas richtungslos, hübsch allerdings schon.

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM: gypsy goes jazz, #133: Revivals in den 90ern und eine Neuheit aus der Romandie - 14.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #7: tba | No Problem Saloon, #29: tba
    #7618663  | PERMALINK

    udw
    so little gets done

    Registriert seit: 22.06.2005

    Beiträge: 3,284

    Danke für Deine Rückmeldung gypsy. Wobei Du ganz zielsicher nun genau jenen Track ausgesucht hast, bei dem sich mir auch die Nackenhaare sträuben, ob all der gefühligen Patina.
    In anderen Liedern, vor allem von „Colour Yes“ wird für mich die Balance noch eher gewahrt.
    Wobei insgesamt für mich Halsalls Trompetenton noch am wenigsten Funken schlägt, Sopransaxophon, Harfe und Piano gefallen mir besser.
    Z.B. hier:

    oder hier

    --

    so little is fun
    #7618665  | PERMALINK

    gypsy-tail-wind
    Moderator
    Biomasse

    Registriert seit: 25.01.2010

    Beiträge: 62,156

    Ich habe oben bei den Links etwas verbockt, aber welches der dritte Track war (da ist ja zweimal der Link zu „Sun in September“, ist das der Song mit den Nackenhaaren?), weiss ich nicht mehr (war auch nicht an meinem Computer, kann da nicht einfach den Spuren nachgehen). Danke für die weiteren Links, will ich mir mal anhören.

    --

    "Don't play what the public want. You play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doin' -- even if it take them fifteen, twenty years." (Thelonious Monk) | Meine Sendungen auf Radio StoneFM: gypsy goes jazz, #133: Revivals in den 90ern und eine Neuheit aus der Romandie - 14.6., 22:00 | Slow Drive to South Africa, #7: tba | No Problem Saloon, #29: tba
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