the Replacements

Ansicht von 10 Beiträgen - 46 bis 55 (von insgesamt 55)
  • Autor
    Beiträge
  • #576931  | PERMALINK

    ursa-minor

    Registriert seit: 29.05.2005

    Beiträge: 4,499

    waDanke für den Hinweis. Habe es mir schon runtergeladen.

    Wie gefällts dir denn?

    wa

    Nett auch der Hinweis vom Meister:

    *A note from Paul:*
    „WARNING: DO NOT LISTEN WHILE OPERATING A MOTOR VEHICLE. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT FAULTY – ALL SOUNDS ARE INTENTIONAL AND VALID AS A WORK OF ART.“

    Der Hinweis war aber auch nötig! :lol: Das wird ja gegen Ende doch recht verquer. Als dieses laute Feedback kam, hab ich mich richtig erschreckt. Folker Westerberg entdeckt seine Vorliebe für „Experimentalmusik“ (nun ja, zumindest auf einer ganz, ganz harmlosen Ebene) …

    Schön auch folgender Hinweis:
    „The song costs $0.49 as Paul thought $0.01 a minute seemed fair.“
    Der Mann ist wirklich zu bescheiden …

    Leider sind es dann ja keine 49, sondern nur knapp 44 Minuten, aber nun denn, Paul Wellers 22 Dreams hatte auch nur 21 Stücke.

    --

    C'mon Granddad!
    Highlights von Rolling-Stone.de
    Werbung
    #576933  | PERMALINK

    wa

    Registriert seit: 18.06.2003

    Beiträge: 23,113

    ursa minorWie gefällts dir denn?

    Bis zum Ende habe ich es noch nicht durchgehalten. Der Anfang ist ja noch nicht experimentell, aber erschreckend schwach. Keine catchy Melodien, die er in der Vergangenheit scheinbar mühelos aus dem Ärmel geschüttelt hat. Ich höre nur belangloses Geschrammel. Aber ich werde morgen noch einmal einen Anlauf starten.

    --

    "Was Du heute kannst verschieben, verschiebe nicht erst morgen!" (Erstes Gebot der Nicht Ganz So Eiligen Kirche der Prokrastinierer der Nächsten Tage)
    #576935  | PERMALINK

    ursa-minor

    Registriert seit: 29.05.2005

    Beiträge: 4,499

    waBis zum Ende habe ich es noch nicht durchgehalten. Der Anfang ist ja noch nicht experimentell, aber erschreckend schwach. Keine catchy Melodien, die er in der Vergangenheit scheinbar mühelos aus dem Ärmel geschüttelt hat. Ich höre nur belangloses Geschrammel. Aber ich werde morgen noch einmal einen Anlauf starten.

    Im Ernst? So schlimm? Vielleicht sind ja einfach meine Ansprüche nicht so hoch, aber ich finde, das Album hat einen guten Flow. Mir gefällt’s.

    Ich finde auch die Idee witzig, es sozusagen als Radiosendung anzulegen, mit all den Störungen zwischendurch, den anderen Tracks, die „von einer anderen Frequenz“ reinfunken, dem kleinen „Medley“ aus Hits am Ende …

    Ich finde auch den Anfang gar nicht so schwach. Ich finde eher, dass es ab der Mitte ein wenig beliebig wird. Im Büro hab ich mich heute dabei erwischt, wie ich „Something in my life is missing“ vor mich hinsummte. Und dieses „The devil raised a good boy“ (ist das über Johnny Cash?) finde ich auch gut.

    Das Ende, wo sein Sohn rumschreit, werde ich mir wohl nicht unbedingt öfter anhören, aber ich finde, das Ganze ist eine runde Sache. Und auf Folker war auch nicht jeder Song ein Hit. Okay, ein „As far as I know“ gibt es auf der neuen Scheibe nicht, aber ich finde es wie gesagt als „Gesamtwerk“ eigentlich recht witzig, es bringt mich zum Grinsen und verursacht gute Laune (zumindest bei mir).

    --

    C'mon Granddad!
    #576937  | PERMALINK

    cassavetes

    Registriert seit: 09.03.2006

    Beiträge: 5,771

    Schöne Review zu den neu aufgelegten alten Platten:
    http://groundcontrolmag.com/index.php?m=article&article_id=1320

    Und wo ich schon mal hier bin, habe ich noch dieses Westerberg-Interview vom November gefunden:
    http://www.rockband.com/zine/paul_westerberg_interview

    #576939  | PERMALINK

    ursa-minor

    Registriert seit: 29.05.2005

    Beiträge: 4,499

    CassavetesSchöne Review zu den neu aufgelegten alten Platten:
    http://groundcontrolmag.com/index.php?m=article&article_id=1320

    Danke, Cassa. Da hat der Autor ja wirklich Herzblut reingelegt, in die Besprechungen! Lang, aber lesenswert.

    --

    C'mon Granddad!
    #576941  | PERMALINK

    cassavetes

    Registriert seit: 09.03.2006

    Beiträge: 5,771

    Der Mpls Star-Tribune gratuliert zum 50. (der war an Silvester)

    Paul Scott: Paul Westerberg aging well at 50

    If you think about it, that’s no small feat for a rocker. It’s also a good sign for those of us who are contemporaries.

    By PAUL SCOTT

    Last update: December 30, 2009 – 4:44 PM

    Paul Westerberg is 50. I’m not the head of his fan club or anything, but the other day it occurred to me that the south Minneapolis songwriter behind the Replacements was probably getting older, so I looked it up on Wikipedia, and what do you know. Date of birth: 12-31-59. It’s not easy to write about Westerberg, a private person who is very likely ambivalent about the praise so often laid at his feet, no doubt because so much of it emanates from the quivering hands of middle-aged hipsters wearing skinny jeans, dark-framed glasses and Chuck Taylors. (Yes, I am all the above, though I like to think that I am not that guy.) But something about his story makes you want to give it a try.
    Starting in the 1980s, the Replacements injected a much-needed dose of mischief into a musical environment close to being overtaken by poseurs and synth-rock. Westerberg and his bandmates Tommy Stinson, Chris Mars and Bob Stinson took their direction from romantic songwriters and glam bands from the coasts — sentimental troubadours like Eric Carmen and Neil Diamond and party hounds like Thin Lizzy and Kiss. Ambitious, skilled, and swaggering but not stupid, they were the Clash without the notion that they had something important to say.

    Originally content to play simply fast and loud, Westerberg’s often comic and daring music grew increasingly more ambitious. By the band’s third and fourth albums, he was throwing off evocative tales of heartbreak, pain and confusion at a level that most bands would be lucky to stumble upon once in a career. Commercially, the Replacements mostly went nowhere, but you have to remember, this was the decade of Phil Collins.

    Filled with appreciation for the Police, I remember having little time for the Replacements during their prime. A couple of years ago, however, I took a road trip with my brothers to see the Police reunited, and I faced the grudging — and expensive — realization that though they had all been huge hits in their day, songs like „Message in a Bottle“ were not weathering the test of time very comfortably.

    Many once-neglected songs of Paul Westerberg, on the other hand, are now being played in the locker room at the decidedly not-hip health club where I do my chin-ups. „Can’t Hardly Wait“ plays on the background reel in my gym alongside classic songs like „Help,“ and Roy Orbison’s „Cryin'“ — and it fits right in. The lyrics to that buoyant tune once escaped me, but now I am struck by the maturity of their message about grace and simple love of home in the face of human loneliness.

    The Replacements unleashed an unfortunate wave of bands sporting self-deprecating names. Given a few decades to sort it all out, I am starting to think Westerberg’s cynicism was about something bigger than insecurity or sarcasm. The Reagan era had become known as „Morning in America,“ if you will recall, and if ever a dark joke has been told, surely that was it.

    Westerberg, a nice kid from a good family and the Catholic schools of south Minneapolis, entered adult life having been handed only a mop. According to Jim Walsh’s oral history „The Replacements: All Over But The Shouting,“ the singer cleaned the floor under the raised feet of Walter Mondale.

    Like a thousand other people from Minneapolis, I had my small brushes with Paul Westerberg, and though it might not be très cool to say such a thing, it’s an experience that feels more privileged to me as the time passes and his place in the story of American music becomes more apparent. I grew up a few blocks from his family and was friends with his little sister.

    From this meager vantage point, I feel safe in disclosing that the fragile poet of 1980s thrash rock was your basic big brother holed up in his room with a guitar; a little mysterious, occasionally supportive, coming and going in a hurry.

    Here’s the cool part: As an incubator for an true musical original, his family had no pretense. They watched the Twins. His mom liked the Rat Pack. His sister tanned. His dad would confuse the mention of Lou Reed with Lou Rawls.

    There’s no road map for a patron saint of rock ’n‘ roll lucky enough to reach middle age. Westerberg continues to turn out good music and is presumably content to amuse himself by putting funny prices on his songs and living a quiet life in a town he transcended but never really left.

    A talented cast of his contemporaries, musical offspring and spiritual kinfolk never passed 50: John Lennon, Phil Lynott, Kurt Cobain, Marc Bolan, Elliott Smith, Nick Drake and Joe Strummer, who reached the milestone, but not much farther. Paul got there, and I think that’s a good sign for all of us. I hope he is well, is appreciated and, most of all, is glad to be alive.

    Paul Scott is a writer in Rochester.

    #576943  | PERMALINK

    ursa-minor

    Registriert seit: 29.05.2005

    Beiträge: 4,499

    Schöner Artikel, danke! Obwohl ich mir ja nicht sicher bin, ob es Westerberg so wahnsinnig freut, dass seine Musik heutzutage in Fitness-Studios läuft …

    Der Autor hat eine komische Art, Komplimente zu machen: „A talented cast of his contemporaries, musical offspring and spiritual kinfolk never passed 50 … Paul got there, and I think that’s a good sign for all of us. I hope he is well, is appreciated and, most of all, is glad to be alive.“ —— WTF?

    --

    C'mon Granddad!
    #576945  | PERMALINK

    cassavetes

    Registriert seit: 09.03.2006

    Beiträge: 5,771

    ursa minorDer Autor hat eine komische Art, Komplimente zu machen

    Stimmt schon, irgendwie. Da ist er wieder, der Unterschied zwischen gut gemeint und gut gemacht/formuliert. :-)

    #576947  | PERMALINK

    ragged-glory

    Registriert seit: 22.03.2007

    Beiträge: 11,564

    punknews.orgThe Replacements are streaming their new EP Songs for Slim.

    The EP is to raise money for former Replacements member Slim Dunlap, who suffered a serious stroke last February. 250 autographed 10-inch records were auctioned off in January, and raised over $100,000 for Dunlap. A digital release is planned for March 5, 2013, and a 12-inch vinyl release following on April 16, 2013.

    .

    --

    #11242093  | PERMALINK

    nail75

    Registriert seit: 16.10.2006

    Beiträge: 42,653

    Das neue Triple-LP „The Complete Inconcerated Live“ ist wesentlich glatter und weniger alkoholgetränkt als das frühere und bessere Live-Album „Live At Maxwells“, das ironischerweise auch deutlich besser klingt. Außerdem bietet „Maxwells“ wesentlich mehr von den Klassikern und Hits der Band, während „Inconcerated“ unter einem etwas durchwachsenen Material leidet. Hörenswert ist es natürlich dennoch, aber Maxwell ist essentiell.

    --

    Ohne Musik ist alles Leben ein Irrtum.
Ansicht von 10 Beiträgen - 46 bis 55 (von insgesamt 55)

Schlagwörter: 

Du musst angemeldet sein, um auf dieses Thema antworten zu können.