Paul Weller

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  • #10855921  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 20,435

    Come together

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    Highlights von Rolling-Stone.de
    Werbung
    #10856985  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 20,435

    Was ist in Wellers Jukebox?

    https://www.scritticopy.com/post/what-s-on-paul-weller-s-jukebox?fbclid=IwAR264of7C2bf6sRNEx-f9UnqJOmhJQ8jahHPZx_r1m1cZLBCvohb5NWmMDI

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #10859515  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 20,435

    Ich habe hier mal einen Thread zum neuen Album von P.P. Arnold eröffnet. Cradock hat produziert und Songs beigesteuert, Weller auch (Shoot the Dove und When I Was Part of Your Picture).

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #10870429  | PERMALINK

    liam1994

    Registriert seit: 31.12.2002

    Beiträge: 1,538

    Gestern in London:

     

     

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    Nie mehr Zweite Liga!!!
    #10870431  | PERMALINK

    songbird

    Registriert seit: 01.11.2003

    Beiträge: 33,219

    Warst du da, Liam?

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    #10870447  | PERMALINK

    liam1994

    Registriert seit: 31.12.2002

    Beiträge: 1,538

    Schön wär’s gewesen. Leider nein.

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    Nie mehr Zweite Liga!!!
    #10879813  | PERMALINK

    k-o-r-r

    Registriert seit: 21.07.2016

    Beiträge: 148

    Wer das 5 x 7″ Box set „Sonik Kicks – The Singles Collection“ noch nicht hat:

    https://yeproc.11spot.com/paul-weller-sonik-kicks-the-singles-collection-7-inch-vinyl-box-set-1.html

    Sonderangebot: 19,99 USD plus 8,00 USD Porto also für schlappe 26,00 Euro zu haben.

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    #10879819  | PERMALINK

    k-o-r-r

    Registriert seit: 21.07.2016

    Beiträge: 148

    Und wer „Other Aspects, Live at the Royal Festival Hall“ noch als Vinyl haben möchte:

    https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B07MBHR49Y/ref=?ie=UTF8&m=A3JWKAKR8XB7XF&psc=1

    Nach Abzug des zeitlich begrenzten Rabattes kostet das Dreifach-Vinyl nur noch 33,61 Euro !

    Update: Rabatt-Aktion seid heute vorbei :-( – das Angebot hat Euch aber anscheinend auch nicht interessiert

    zuletzt geändert von k-o-r-r

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    #10891703  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 20,435

    http://www.pennyblackmusic.co.uk/MagSitePages/Article/9389/Bruce-Foxton-Interview

    Bruce Foxton – Interview

    John Clarkson

    Bruce Foxton was the bassist in the massively successful mod revival trio
    The Jam, who between their debut in 1977 and their break-up in 1982 recorded
    six albums and had eighteen Top 40 hits in the UK.

    After The Jam, which also consisted of Paul Weller (vocals, guitar) and Rick
    Buckler (drums), split up, Foxton released a solo album,’Touch Sensitive‘
    (1984), and spent sixteen years in the Irish punk band Stiff Little Fingers.

    Since 2007, Foxton, who is now aged 64, has been in From The Jam, which also
    features Russell Hastings on vocals and initially until 2010 Buckler on
    drums. While From The Jam focuses entirely on playing material from The Jam
    song book, Foxton has also released two further solo albums, ‚Back in the
    Room‘ (2012) and ‚Smash the Clock‘ (2016), both of which were co-written and
    recorded with Hastings. Both these albums featured guest appearances from
    Paul Weller, who Foxton had rekindled his friendship with in 2009 after many
    years apart.

    From The Jam will be undertaking a lengthy UK tour from October in which
    they will be playing The Jam’s 1979 fourth album ‚Setting Sons‘ in its
    entirety to commemorate its 40th anniversary. ‚Setting Sons‘ includes ‚The
    Eton Rifles‘, a damning indictment of the class structure and boarding
    school system in the UK, Foxton’s own much acclaimed ‚Smithers-Jones‘, the
    epic ‚Little Boy Soldiers‘ and a divisive cover of Martha and the Vandellas‘
    ‚Heatwave‘.

    Pennyblackmusic spoke to Bruce Foxton about ‚Setting Sons‘ and the
    forthcoming 40th Anniversary tour.

    PB: You are going out on the road in October in the UK to celebrate the 40th
    anniversary of ‚Setting Sons‘. Will you be playing in its entirety from
    beginning to end and then giving the rest of set over to other Jam songs?

    BRUCE FOXTON: That’s right. We will be playing it from front to back. I am
    looking forward to it and revisiting it. There are some great songs on
    there. The rest of the set will be other Jam hits and album tracks.

    PB: It was at the time your most musically ambitious album. ‚Little Boy
    Soldiers‘, for example, consists of three movements. How easy is it going to
    be bringing songs like that to the stage?

    BF: Well, that particular song we know works well live. We have played it
    quite a lot although not recently, but it won’t be a problem. I am just
    looking at the track listing now, and there is nothing on three that scares
    me. ‚Wasteland‘, for example, is a brilliant song, and it was also quite
    ambitious.

    We were under a lot of pressure from the record label to get ‚Setting Songs‘
    out. Paul wrote much of it during the day, and Rick and I would then work
    through the night on my bass lines and his drumming. It obviously turned out
    really well in the end, but it was a bit of a strange way of working.

    PB: The most famous song on ‚Setting Sons‘ is ‚The Eton Rifles‘, which gave
    you your first Top 10 hit. The former prime minister and Etonian David
    Cameron listed it as one of his ten most famous songs.

    BF: I was actually doing a radio interview at the same time, and he was on
    the same programme. He said that to my face (Laughs). I don’t think that he
    really got the gist of the song, to be honest.

    PB: The other most famous song is your own song ‚Smithers-Jones‘, which was
    written in reaction to your dad being forced to retire after being made
    redundant.

    BF: It doesn’t take Sherlock Holmes to understand that lyric. It sadly
    happens to most people in the walk of life. I went up to London a couple of
    days ago on a commuter train to do some interviews, and I know that it is
    needs must for most of the people on there. You just think, „Oh, here they
    go again.“ As soon as they get on the commuter train, their laptops open up
    and away they go. It was half past ten in the morning, and then when I had
    finished my interviews I came back on the seven or eight ‚o‘ clock train and
    they were still doing it. You are thinking loyalty ain’t going to mean a
    thing at the end of the day when you are no use and you are just going to be
    disregarded. I don’t think that it ever will get better. To be fair to them,
    they have got to earn a living and if that is what it takes then they have
    to do it.

    PB: It was originally released as the B-side to the single ‚When You’re
    Young‘. Why did you decide to put it out on the album in a strings version?

    BF: It was forty years ago, but I think that it was down to the producer Vic
    Coppersmith-Heaven or Vic Smith to his friends. I think he suggested that we
    should get ‚Smithers-Jones‘ scored and it would sound great orchestrally. I
    was just thrilled, because I didn’t get that many songs on albums and to
    have it done orchestrally was a real buzz. I think that it really works.

    PB: ‚Setting Sons‘ won five star reviews at the time, but the one criticism
    against it was its cover of ‚Heatwave‘, which many people thought was
    out-of-place. It could be argued that as it came right at the end of the
    album it was almost like an extra track. Why did you put it on the album in
    the first place?

    BF: It was a great live track. It went down really well on stage and we
    thought, „Let’s put it on the album.“ There was no other reason for it going
    on, apart from it was a real favourite of the audience in the live set.

    PB: The fans seem to have really warmed to Russell Hastings. It can’t be an
    easy job replacing someone as iconic as Paul Weller. Do you think he has
    gone down well in From The Jam because he has simply maintained a deep
    respect for the Jam’s song book?

    BF: That is exactly it. He has got total respect for those songs. All those
    years ago when we embarked on From The Jam we did some rehearsals with Rick
    and myself and obviously Russ to see if it would work. Rick and I both knew
    that the Jam’s songs are held in high esteem with our fans and audience, and
    we didn’t want to tarnish that or not do it justice, but after a few days‘
    rehearsal I thought this deserves to be heard and out there. There was never
    going to be a reformation of the Jam, but this was to me the closest thing
    to it with Rick and myself, two thirds of the band. Russ was obviously wary
    about not trying to copy Paul, he is obviously similar but he brings his own
    take to the songs.

    PB: Is it true that he was at The Jam’s last ever gig in Brighton in 1982?

    BF: I believe so. It is strange how things come around. He was there at our
    last show and here he is fronting the band.

    PB: On the subject of things coming around your support band for most of
    these dates will be the Vapors. They played some dates with the Jam back in
    1979. Do things in some ways seem to have gone full circle by inviting them
    to play?

    BF: I suppose that you could say that. It will be a pleasure to have them as
    special guests on the tour. They did a show last year with us in Salisbury,
    a one-off, and they still sound good. They look good. It will be fun to have
    them with us.

    PB: You used to manage them in the late ’70s with Paul Weller’s late father
    John.

    BF: There was a pub, the Three Lions in Godalming. Its nickname is
    ‚Scratchers‘, and I used to go there. We used to have a lads‘ night out once
    a week many moons ago and the Vapors used to play in there. I used to really
    enjoy them, and we got chatting and I became friends and I said, „Would you
    be up for me representing you going to a record company and seeing if we can
    get you a deal?“ They were up for it, and United Artists signed them up.

    I asked John Weller if he would help because we were obviously very busy and
    it was too much for me to manage them on my own, so I helped them with the
    musical side of things and John took care of the more serious side of things
    such as publishing.

    PB: Usually when musicians go out on the road doing their old songs again
    after an initial surge of interest their popularity wanes, but you have now
    been doing From The Jam longer than you were in The Jam and that has never
    really happened before. Has that surprised you that people are still so
    enthusiastic about seeing your shows?

    BF: Yes, absolutely. It is a testament to the quality of the songs lyrically
    and musically. I am very grateful. Our audiences are getting bigger rather
    than reducing which is very encouraging.

    Our agent phoned me up about something else and, all joking aside, said,
    „Look, Bruce. We have to phone ahead and book ahead early if we want the
    better choice of venues. Do you think that you’ll still be up for something
    when you’re seventy?“ My reaction was to laugh when she told me. My wife
    laughed when I told her also, but after a brief burst of laughter I said,
    „Why not?“ The audience still wants to hear this music, and basically it all
    comes down to if I am physically capable. I hope that I am. If I am in good
    health when I am seventy I will be out there still doing it.

    They are great songs. Paul Weller also keeps it alive. He plays a few Jam
    songs in his set. I understand that the latest ‚Spiderman‘ movie has got ‚A
    Town Called Malice‘ on its soundtrack. These songs have a permanence.

    PB : There is no reason why you should not go back on the road at seventy.
    The Who do it and they keep getting better and better.

    BF: Yeah, the Stones as well. I can understand now why. When I was younger,
    I thought, „Why are they still going at forty? Go on. Give it a break now!“
    But now, I am kind of in that boat now myself and I love it. I love playing
    those songs. I love being out on the road. I am very grateful and lucky.
    Russ and I are really good mates now and on the road. We have got a great
    drummer, Mike Randon, who has been with us for five years now. Our keyboard
    player, Andy Fairclough, is another great player, and we all travel together
    in a car to the shows and have a laugh. What a great way to spend your time
    really!

    PB: You have now co-written two albums with Russell Hastings, ‚Back in the
    Room‘ and ‚Smash the Clock‘. Why did you decide to release them under your
    name rather than as From The Jam?

    BF: It just wasn’t From The Jam. We wanted to run it in parallel, I guess.
    There will be another Foxton and Hastings‘ album out at some point. We have
    probably got enough songs. We keep recording bits and pieces when we are at
    soundchecks, but it is just a question of time. You have got to have a bit
    of home life amongst all of this. I don’t know when the album will come out.
    We have got to try and find the time for that as well.

    PB: How is your relationship with Paul Weller now? You have said in the past
    that it means everything to you that you are friends again.

    BF: It took the passing of my first wife Pat and the passing of John Weller
    for Paul and myself to bang our heads together and to realise how trivial
    and ridiculous what we fell out over was. Paul was very good when Pat was
    having treatment for cancer in Israel. He phoned up a couple of times to see
    how she was doing. It has brought us back together again, and I am sure that
    Pat and John would welcome that.

    We are good mates. I don’t phone him up every day but he would be there if I
    needed him. He would answer the phone. We spoke briefly about doing another
    Foxton and Hastings album. Paul often pops into the studio we use because it
    is his and he often has business to take care of, and I would like to think
    that if he happened to pop in he would like to play on a track. It is very
    loose with Paul. I think that is the way he likes to be. If it happens, it
    happens.

    PB: And what is your relationship like with Rick Buckler these days?

    BF: I would say non-existent, to be honest. I do not know why he has not got
    back to me at all. I have sent him a few emails and Christmas cards over the
    years, and it got to the point as it did last Christmas in which I didn’t
    bother sending him one. It is a real shame. I would like to honestly know
    why he doesn’t want to speak to me. It is very sad.

    There have been a few opportunities in which we could have buried whatever
    the hatchet was. When we had the Jam exhibition at Somerset House in London
    in 2015, I went along. Paul was there. We hung out together for a bit. That
    was lovely. There was no sign of Rick. He made out that he had something
    else to do, but that would have been an ideal opportunity to reunite us
    really. Nobody was planning a reformation of the band, but it would have
    been an ideal opportunity to say hi and take a few photographs.

    PB: Last question! From The Jam are touring Hong Kong and Australia in
    September, and then you are touring here on the ‚Setting Sons‘ tour between
    October and December. That is going to take you until 2020. What are you
    plans after that?

    BF: Well, the actual ‚Setting Sons‘ tour goes on until April next year. We
    will take e a break in February. We like to take February out. We need it by
    then. We need a bit of time off to re-energise, and then out we go again.

    I know we want to do a lot more acoustic shows because they have been going
    really well, and we will also do some festivals next year. It goes on. Maybe
    next year there will be the third Foxton and Hastings album.

    PB: Thank you.

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #10898081  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 20,435

    Auf Wellargh:

    Paul Weller
    Westonbirt Arboretum
    14 June 2019

    Long Time
    My Ever Changing Moods (The Style Council song)
    I’m Where I Should Be
    Man in the Corner Shop (The Jam song)
    Friday Street
    Out of the Sinking
    Wild Wood
    A Man of Great Promise (The Style Council song)
    Brushed
    Mermaids
    Strange Museum
    Can You Heal Us (Holy Man) (with Stone Foundation)
    Woo Sé Mama
    Hung Up
    Shout to the Top! (The Style Council song)
    Have You Ever Had It Blue(The Style Council song)
    Above the Clouds
    Into Tomorrow
    Peacock Suit (with Stone Foundation)
    Phoenix
    Saturns Pattern
    You Do Something to Me
    Broken Stones
    Start! (The Jam song) (with Stone Foundation)
    Precious (The Jam song) (with Stone Foundation)
    Move On Up (Curtis Mayfield cover) (with Stone Foundation)
    Town Called Malice (The Jam song)

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #10898091  | PERMALINK

    kurganrs

    Registriert seit: 25.12.2015

    Beiträge: 4,285

    @marbeck, danke. :bye:

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    #10898123  | PERMALINK

    j-w
    Moderator
    maximum rhythm & blues

    Registriert seit: 09.07.2002

    Beiträge: 38,587

    Wow, toller Sound, vielen Dank!!!

    --

    Staring at a grey sky, try to paint it blue - Teenage Blue
    #10898543  | PERMALINK

    k-o-r-r

    Registriert seit: 21.07.2016

    Beiträge: 148

    Schöne Aufnahme von einem tollen Konzert – vielen Dank Marbeck. Ich hatte mich bemüht, im Sommer ein Konzert in England/Schottland zu finden, aber leider war es wegen anderer Termin nicht möglich. Ich hoffe sehr, dass Paul mit einem ähnlichen Set-Up mal wieder in die Nähe kommt.

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    #10898545  | PERMALINK

    k-o-r-r

    Registriert seit: 21.07.2016

    Beiträge: 148

    Mal etwas Anderes: ich bin vor Kurzen zufällig über diese tolle Coverversion eines Jam Titels gestolpert:

    Habt ihr diese Version schon gekannt und wer kann noch ein paar andere hörenswerte Versionen von Jam/TSC/PW Songs nennen.

    zuletzt geändert von k-o-r-r

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    #10898591  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 20,435

    Das ist Steve Riks, nicht David Bowie.

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
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