Paul Weller

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  • #10600968  | PERMALINK

    midnight-mover

    Registriert seit: 08.07.2002

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    Die Bonus-Tracks kann man sich auch auf Deezer anhören. Mayfly (Reflex Revision) gäbe eine gute B-Seite ab…

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    "I know a few groovy middle-aged people, but not many." Keith Richards 1966
    Highlights von Rolling-Stone.de
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    #10601076  | PERMALINK

    k-o-r-r

    Registriert seit: 21.07.2016

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    midnight-moverDie Bonus-Tracks kann man sich auch auf Deezer anhören. Mayfly (Reflex Revision) gäbe eine gute B-Seite ab…

    Meiner Meinung nach wäre dies eine A-Seite, wesentlich besser als das Original. Und ein gutes Beispiel dafür, was Paul mit der akustischen und orchestralen Produktion verschenkt hat.

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    #10601078  | PERMALINK

    k-o-r-r

    Registriert seit: 21.07.2016

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    parryJapanese bonus reuploaded at wellargh!!! Hope it’s OK now.

    Now it worked – many thanks !!!

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    #10602228  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

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    j-w„Strange Museum“! Hat er das je live gespielt?

    Keith schreibt auf Splinters:

    One of the cool things with what you know I’m doing is I’m also putting
    all set lists into a database. Due to that, I’m able to do some pretty
    cool stuff. ;)
    The Strange Museum has been played live before, but not since about 5
    December 1990. He also did on 30 November 1990. I’m sure it was played
    other times, but not since the Paul Weller Movement days. I’ve still got
    a lot of that early stuff to go through yet.

    Keith

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    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #10602260  | PERMALINK

    k-o-r-r

    Registriert seit: 21.07.2016

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    j-w„Strange Museum“! Hat er das je live gespielt? Tolle Wahl, auch „Country“.

    Also für mich war und ist „Strange Museum“ der schwächste Titel vom ersten Solo-Album. Daher muss ich den nicht unbedingt live erleben. „Country“ dagegen würde ich gerne mal wieder geniessen… :good:

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    #10604139  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

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    Later… with Jools Holland next Tuesday 16 Oct & Friday 19 Oct
    No stranger to the show, or indeed our cultural life of the last 40 years, Paul Weller returns to perform in an acoustic vein with just regular cohort Steve Craddock and a string quartet. Paul and co are in the middle of the studio floor with a track from his recently released 14th solo album True Meanings, a collection of dreamily autumnal, wistful, even melancholy songs. Weller debuted on Later… in 1993 with Sunflower and has appeared on the show more than any other artist.

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    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #10604141  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

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    Weller Interview mit Classic Rock

    https://classicrock.net/paul-weller-interview-true-meanings/

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #10605753  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

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    j-wWas mich auch interessieren würde…

    Tracklist:

    One Bright Star – done in a swing/bossa nova style

    Glide

    Soul Searchers

    Boy About Town

    Have you Ever had it Blue

    What Would He Say

    Wild Wood

    Country

    Aspects

    Strange Museum

    Amongst Butterflies

    Old Castles

    Gravity

    Where’er you Go (with Hannah Peel on violin)

    A Man of Great Promise

    Mayfly

    Private Hell

    Tales from the Riverbank

    Moving On

    Long Long Road

    Hopper

    White Horses

    Encore

    Books – complete with Sitars etc.

    You do Something to Me

    May Love travel with you

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #10607195  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

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    Paul Weller Royal Festival Hall review: A night of genuine musical genius

    At sixty, Paul Weller has finally come of age. GQ Editor, Dylan Jones, on why Weller’s Royal Festival Hall gig was a monumental show for the performer.

    The thought of going to see one of your favourite artists and being told that not only are they not going to play any of their greatest hits, but instead are going to methodically work their way through their new album, well, it might cause you to think again, surely. Seriously, it’s a Friday night. You could be at home, working your way through the second series of Ozark. You saw your so-called favourite artist a few years ago, and it was great, and they’re bound to bounce around again in a few months, aren’t they, in the way that artists with a genuine following tend to dust off their dancing shoes on a regular basis these days?

    I remember going to see the Eagles a few years ago at the O2, when they were touring their comeback album, and being told the precise time to turn up in order not to have to sit through their new album, so I could pitch up and tap my toes to their greatest hits. This information was so inexact – precisely inexact, in fact – that I had to endure an hour and a half of an album I never had any intention of listening to in the first place, and one that I’ve certainly never played since. In all honesty the whole experience put me off the Eagles for life.

    Not that any of the people gathered at the Festival Hall on London’s Southbank last night would have cared less. Paul Weller fans tend to be rather proscriptive, and wouldn’t admit to liking the Eagles if their lives depended on it. They’re purists, most of them, much like the man himself, true believers, carriers of the Modernist flame, and the kind of obsessives who laugh at you if you’re wearing the wrong shoes. Which, in all honesty, doesn’t make them bad people. Last night I saw people who, like myself, have been going to Paul Weller gigs since 1977, those whose belief in the Modfather has over the years slowly developed into a genuine familial fondness. It’s like we’re all turning up to an uncle’s significant birthday; every few years he decides to throw a big bash, and we rush to be there, not just because we know we’re going to enjoy it, because also we wouldn’t want to miss it. We don’t want to be left out. After all, it’s not often you’re given carte blanche to laugh at other people’s shoes.

    A night of genuine warmth, a night of genuine musical genius

    I remember going to see Weller when he played the Albert Hall in 1992, and thinking how incongruous it was that someone I’d first seen play the 100 Club in at the height of punk was now firmly embedded in the establishment (I think we were both wearing pinstripe suits, and I kept think of that Virginia Slims ad with the tag line: you’ve come a long way, baby). It was a terrific concert, but then I’ve never known him to give a bad performance, not in forty years. Sure, I’ve seen him grumpy, deliberately uncommunicative, and downright surly. But he’s never given less than his all.

    Last night’s venue was far more fitting than the Albert Hall, as the modernist splendour of the Festival Hall was the perfect setting for Weller’s clipped, orchestral experiment. We were here to hear him play a full acoustic set that largely contained his recent and very brilliant album, True Meanings. We knew we weren’t going to get the greatest hits, although considering that Weller’s greatest hits comprise some 150 songs, that was probably just as well (we would have been here all night, making it impossible to watch any episodes of Ozark).

    Which is a very long-winded way of saying that each and every one of us at the Festival Hall knew what we were letting ourselves in for, and judging by the rapturous applause after the encores, I don’t think any of us left the theatre in any way disappointed.

    Because it was, I have to say, superb, a night of genuine warmth, a night of genuine musical genius, watching a performer at the very top of his game. At the age of sixty – which he was publicly reminded of on stage last night, much to his mock irritation – Paul Weller has final come of age. I know, a cliché, right? And the kind of things critics have been saying about him since he was 19, but last night it suddenly felt like it had some veracity. Yes, there was a smattering of old songs – the Jam’s “Private Hell” and “Tales from the Riverbank”, the Style Council’s “Have you Ever Had it Blue” as well as the obligatory “Wild Wood” and “You do Something to Me” – but the bulk of the evening was devoted to the True Meanings album, a record that grew in stature last night as Weller’s songs were robustly supported by his five-piece band, plus an eleven-strong string section led by the intoxicating conductor Hannah Peel, and a four-piece horn section as well as a harpist, a flautist and – fleetingly – three Indian musicians playing sitars and violin, along with the evening’s opening act, British singer Lucy Rose. Often there were twenty-six musicians onstage, and yet this was the most acoustic of evenings, allowing Weller’s songs to breathe and – at the risk of descending into hyperbole – sound even better than they do on the album.

    He played just two nights at the Festival hall this week, not just because it is fearsomely expensive to put on a show like this, but also because it’s completely proscriptive; when you’re playing with an orchestra it’s somewhat difficult to suddenly veer off piste and decide to play orchestral versions of “Butterfly Collector” or “It’s a Very Deep Sea”.

    If you weren’t there, there will be a DVD of these performances released early in the new year, and if you want to stay at home, wallow in some extraordinary music, laugh at other people’s shoes, and still have time to watch an episode of Ozark, I recommend you get it.

    Oh, and one further thing. Weller smiled, repeatedly, all night.

    I know. Weird, right?

    Being sixty obviously suits him.

    Paul Weller setlist:

    „One Bright Star“
    „Glide“
    „The Soul Searchers“
    „Boy About Town“
    „Have You Ever Had It Blue“
    „What Would He Say?“
    „Wild Wood“
    „Country“
    „Aspects“
    „Strange Museum“
    „Amongst Butterflies“
    „Old Castles“
    „Gravity“
    „Where’er Ye Go“
    „A Man of Great Promise“
    „Mayfly“
    „Private Hell“
    „Tales From the Riverbank“
    „Movin‘ On“
    „Long Long Road“
    „Hopper“
    „White Horses“

    Encore:

    „Books“ (with Lucy Rose)
    „You Do Something to Me“
    „May Love Travel With You“

    https://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/article/pa…cal-genius

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    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #10607223  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

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    Paul Weller, Royal Festival Hall, review: Career-spanning show from an artist ageing with grace and beauty

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    Rarely heard tracks from across the Modfather’s career, from ‘The Jam’ to new folk-rock solo album ‘True Meanings’, are performed with an orchestra. By Elisa Bray

    Watching Paul Weller stride onto the stage and perch serenely at the grand piano to serenade us with opening song “One Bright Star”, you could almost forget the angry punk roots from which he emerged as frontman of The Jam in the Seventies.

    But then a fight breaks out in the stalls of the civilised, seated Royal Festival Hall. It’s safe to say that this venue won’t have seen many fights in its auditorium, especially judging by the length of time – at least two songs of Weller’s set – that it takes to stop it. If he notices, he doesn’t let on.

    In interviews, Weller has voiced his disapproval of his contemporaries on “the nostalgia circuit”, forever touting their decades-old greatest hits. His forward-looking goal to stay relevant has meant consistently putting out a new release every one or two years since his first solo album in 1992 (just one, Saturns Pattern, arrived after a three-year hiatus), experimenting with genres as he did so. And in the year the Modfather turned 60, he has reinvented himself yet again, abandoning the dad-rock of last year’s A Kind Revolution with the pastoral folk-rock and new-found reflectiveness of True Meanings – the majority of which he brings to glorious life tonight alongside an orchestra and his band.

    The lullabic, dreamy “Glide” is resplendent, with strings, rippling harp glissandi and harmonising backing vocals. The wistful introspection of the lilting “Gravity”, with its lyrics “Find the child inside of me / This rusty key will set him free”, is augmented by mournful strings, delicate pizzicato and gentle finger-picked acoustic guitar. That Weller, for the most part, sits at the stage front playing guitar, creates a more intimate feel to the performance, adding to the sense of self-reflection. The sparse but majestic ballad “Where’er Ye Go” from 22 Dreams is an affecting romantic highlight; Weller’s piano accompanied by arranger Hannah Peel’s violin.

    True Meanings standout “White Horses”, just before the encore, is taken to emotive heights, its buildup of folk-rock instrumentation – strings, percussion, flute and flourishes of brass – a heart-swelling highlight.

    This is a crowd of devoted Mod fans, so tonight’s set spans Weller’s career, including rarely heard tracks from The Style Council (“Man of Great Promise”) and The Jam (“Private Hell” and “Boy About Town”). But, above all, this is a showcase for True Meanings, and every song – whatever its era – is put through the new album’s bucolic loveliness, performed with the orchestra.

    “Wild Wood”, from his second solo album, shows off Weller’s soulful vocals. It’s followed by that same album’s “Country” which demonstrates his earlier folky sensibilities. Many songs Weller introduces as being ones not played for years: “Strange Museum” for example, last performed the previous century, is sung soulfully at the piano. “Private Hell” and “Boy About Town” are such deep cuts they’ve not been performed since Jam days.

    There’s no sign of much-heard classics “Town Called Malice”, “That’s Entertainment”, “Going Underground” or “Down in the Tube Station at Midnight”, but that would contradict his anti-nostalgia determination. That determination is summed up by tonight’s subtle tweak to the lyrics on “Tales from the Riverbank”, on which he seems to remove the very word “nostalgia”.

    Tickets range from a lofty £50 to £75 for tonight’s show, but no expenses are spared. On the encore’s melancholic “Books”, as well as Lucy Rose’s soft vocals, a trio of guest musicians, cradling sitar, tampura and violin add otherworldly, hypnotic modal folkiness. It’s an understated and beautiful rendition.

    The final song “May Love Travel With You” feels like a parting blessing, its poetic lyrics (“May love travel with you / Forever and without fear / Have grace to see the virtues / Give thanks to them sometimes”) worldly wise and generous in their humanity. Tonight shows an artist growing older with grace, and musical beauty.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-enter…82656.html

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    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #10607225  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
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    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

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    Concert Review: Paul Weller Wows With Career-Spanning Set at Royal Festival Hall

    The veteran British musician focused on his acoustic-based new album but also played deep cuts from The Jam and The Style Council.

    By Jem Aswad

    For reasons both understandable and not, Paul Weller is a prominent member of what we’ll call the Cliff Richard Club: Artists who are revered career superstars in Britain but cult artists in the U.S. While the default explanation that his music is “too British” is valid in some ways, Weller — a 40-plus-year soulful rock veteran, founder of The Jam and the Style Council — has recorded many, many songs that don’t sound particularly British at all, and he’s created a remarkably consistent catalog that covers several different styles while retaining the melodic flair, incisive lyrics and ‘60s influences that brought him to prominence in the first place. Whether he’s channeling The Kinks, Curtis Mayfield or Traffic — or presenting a series of acoustic-based songs embellished with strings, as he has on his latest album “True Meanings” — he still always manages to sound like Weller.

    Something else about Weller is that he’s adored with an almost unsettling fervor by his fans, and two shows this week at London’s Royal Festival Hall — which found him performing acoustic, string-accompanied versions of most of the new album as well as songs from across his entire career — were packed to the brim with them. He responded with a set that was clearly aimed straight at them, presenting not just the bulk of “True Feelings” but also deep cuts reaching back to his days with The Jam and The Style Council — albeit in dramatically revised arrangements — as well as his earliest and more recent solo material. He didn’t bother with the hits that the fans had presumably heard many times: There was no “Town Called Malice,” “My Ever Changing Moods,” “That’s Entertainment,” “Long Hot Summer” or “Changingman.” Weller recently turned 60, and he’s said that contributed in part to the reflective nature of “True Feelings.” In many ways this set was a compliment to that album, being both introspective and retrospective in nature. (The shows were recorded and filmed, although future release plans were unclear at press time.)

    Some six months in the making, this show will only be performed twice — Thursday and tonight — and since Weller is not taking it on tour, he went all in. Along with his usual five-piece band, there was an 11-member string section led by conductor/arranger Hannah Peele; a four-piece horn section; a harpist; a flautist; and for “Books,” the group was joined by three Indian musicians playing sitars and violin, as well as the evening’s opening act, British singer Lucy Rose. At two points during the show, 26 musicians were onstage (and they weren’t even all the same musicians); at others, there were four acoustic guitar players.

    Oddly, despite the vast number of accompanists, the acoustic-based nature of the music meant that Weller’s vocals were much more prominent and exposed than they would be with a more rock-based (or at least louder) accompaniment, placing a much bigger focus — and pressure — on his singing. He rose to it and was in stellar voice on Thursday night: Strong, clear, powerful and subtle as the occasion demanded, stumbling only a couple of times on the knottier lyrical twists during the sprawling 25-song set.

    Opening with “One Bright Star” from his 2008 album “22 Dreams,” Weller dipped into the new album before jumping way back to 1980 and The Jam’s “Sound Affects” album with a slower, dramatic take of “Boy About Town,” and then a jazzy take on the Style Council favorite “Have You Ever Had It Blue.” And so it went for the next 90-odd minutes: Mixed in with many songs from “True Feelings,” were deeper cuts like “Wild Wood,” the Style Council’s “Man of Great Promise” and The Jam’s “Tales From the Riverbank” and “Private Hell.” The latter was the oldest song performed on this night and in some ways the least successful: While the new arrangement was strong, the song, a story of a housewife’s unhappy life, seemed coarse in the context of the more refined rest of the set, and in that way showed how far he’s come.

    Which, in a way, was the entire point of the evening. Weller’s never stayed in one place for long and obviously is no fan of nostalgia, but with these shows he’s moving forward while still allowing himself to take a brief look back.

    https://variety.com/2018/music/news/conc…202978125/

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    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #10607229  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

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    Paul Weller Royal Festival Hall London

    by Geoff Wytcherley

    Paul Weller is showcasing his new album True Meaning’s and chose London’s Royal Festival Hall in which to perform them in. This elegant home of London’s philharmonic orchestra was both big enough to accommodate Weller’s fan base and intimate enough to let them know they were in for something a little different from the recently turned sixty Mod father.

    Swapping the thrashing sound of Rickenbacker’s and Fender’s for acoustic guitars and orchestra Weller performed song’s both new and old -“ very old” Weller pointed out at one point. Opening the night with the 22 Dreams track Bright Star set the tone and atmosphere for an evening that was without the pogoing and chanting but still filled with passion and energy. The second he started singing” I only want you- I only want you” it started to feel like Weller is finding an even deeper and more soulful voice with which to express himself than ever before.

    Weller looked relaxed within himself and confident that what he was about to deliver was going to be very good. Weller singing and playing acoustically is nothing new but accompanied by a full orchestra is and it was a masterstroke. The new songs from his latest release are as powerfully soul baring as they are melodic. You cannot say that this is a return to form for Weller, he is rarely off form, but this is definitely another high point of a career filled with them. True Meaning’s was also an apt title to apply to the reworking of some of his back catalogue. With orchestra backing skilfully arranged by Hannah Peel, Weller also found a new depth to songs such as Boy About Town, which was almost unrecognisable at the start, but was non the less just as driven as the original and Private Hell was gut wrenchingly haunting. It made you think he could rework a greatest hits album and they would sound fresh and new.

    However, it is the new songs that really shone last night. The sitar led Books is out of this world and Gravity and Old Castles were mesmerising in their performance. The crowd were suitably sat in referential hushed silence not wanting to break the spell. Many words have been used to describe Weller’s gig’s over the years but beautiful has probably not been overused in describing his own particular blend of fire and skill but this night was exactly that. “We were going to do Town Called Malice on banjo and washboard” said Weller smiling just before closing the night with May Love Travel With You.

    On this form he could probably get away with that as well.

    *****

    http://www.music-news.com/review/UK/1347…aul-Weller

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #10607241  | PERMALINK

    songbird

    Registriert seit: 01.11.2003

    Beiträge: 31,673

    Ich war eine Woche vorher in London, und habe mich zuerst geärgert, nicht hinzukommen. Obwohl einige Perlen in der setlist sind, finde ich das Projekt „True Meanings“ live so spannend wie abgestandenen Tee. Ich hoffe, er wendet sich jetzt wieder anderen Dingen zu.

    zuletzt geändert von songbird

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    #10609198  | PERMALINK

    parry

    Registriert seit: 13.06.2017

    Beiträge: 10

    GRAVITY (from Later with Jools Holland) on wellargh!!!

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    #10610599  | PERMALINK

    k-o-r-r

    Registriert seit: 21.07.2016

    Beiträge: 124

    parryGRAVITY (from Later with Jools Holland) on wellargh!!!

    Many thanks pal

     

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