Paul Weller

Ansicht von 15 Beiträgen - 15,121 bis 15,135 (von insgesamt 15,136)
  • Autor
    Beiträge
  • #11141667  | PERMALINK

    liam1994

    Registriert seit: 31.12.2002

    Beiträge: 1,585

    marbeck<iframe src=“https://www.youtube.com/embed/WzgLJ_BjOGU?feature=oembed“ width=“500″ height=“281″ frameborder=“0″ allowfullscreen=“allowfullscreen“></iframe>

    Modporn

    --

    Nie mehr Zweite Liga!!!
    Highlights von Rolling-Stone.de
    Werbung
    #11143873  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 21,052

    Uncut | The Ultimate Music Guide: Paul Weller

    Introducing the fully-updated, deluxe edition of our Ultimate Music Guide to the music of Paul Weller. Featuring a wealth of spiky archive interviews and in-depth reviews of every album, from The Jam to The Style Council, all the way to this month’s On Sunset. “It’s philosophical,” Paul tells us in an exclusive new interview, “but also tongue in cheek

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #11146129  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 21,052

    Paul Weller: „I’m trying different things – time is of the essence, man“

    19th June 2020

    NME

    Mark Beaumont

    In one sense, Paul Weller is throwing up his hands. “I’ve had enough of it all, the party politics thing,” he says, his voice thick with a gruff dejection.

    “My reaction [to the December election] was that I was never gonna be interested or involved in any politics ever again, because I just cannot be bothered with any of it. If I was very disappointed with the Tories’ win, I was even more disappointed that Labour lost it. I’m sick of all of it, all the old-fashioned Marxists and Leninists and people who are using philosophy from fucking hundreds of years ago that means nothing now, that has no relevance whatsoever.

    “I’d sooner have something that hasn’t got a name and I think that’s emerging – it emerges from the people themselves.”

    Weller’s fresh disdain for the political pantomime extends to the Dominic Cummings saga – “there’s one law for one and one for the other; when’s that been any different? Who’s had the 24-hour fucking bar forever; the only place you can still smoke indoors?” – and Boris Johnson handling the pandemic crisis like a clown juggling burning balls.

    “I’m no fan of any Tory quite honestly,” he says, down the phone from his Surrey lockdown, “but I don’t understand this thing where we’re waiting on the Prime Minister to tell us what’s going on because he’s not a fucking scientist or a doctor – how would he know? He only tells us what he’s been told by his medical boffins, so it’s a bit stupid to think he’s got all the answers; he’s a politician. It is what it is, and where it’s come from and where it’s gonna go to no-one knows, evidently. We’ve just gotta wait it out and try to carry on as best we can.”

    In another sense, Weller is more fired-up than ever.. Since the release of ‘22 Dreams’ in 2008, rock’s most inspirational changingman has been setting a pace of adventurous experimentation virtually unprecedented among the rock legend set. Even Eno has a ‘predictable’ setting and even Bowie took his 60s off. Weller, meanwhile, clearly allergic to laurels, has released over a decade of surprising, challenging and alchemical records visiting 21st Century psych, glam punk, krautrock, neo-soul and all manner of other sonic co-ordinates located way off the ‘Modfather’ map.

    2018’s pastoral folk excursion ‘True Meanings’ almost acted as a quick breather to pastiche the ageing rockers who take a more rootsy retirement, and now he’s back with another inspired double-take of a record which will, like 2012’s ‘Sonik Kicks’, 2015’s ‘Saturns Pattern’ and 2017’s ‘A Kind Revolution’, make you check twice that you’re definitely listening to a Paul Weller album. In January he released ‘In Another Room’, an EP of musique concrète [existing sounded warped into music] experiments for the UK label Ghost Box Records, and such avant-garde montage methods merge with a rich seam of classic ‘70s funk, lounge and sci-fi soul to make his new album, ‘On Sunset’, arguably his most boundary-pushing outing yet.

    “It’s something I’ve really started to enjoy listening to,” he says of his new interest in the avant-garde, citing Stockhausen, The Radiophonic Workshop and French composer Pierre Schaeffer as primary sources that led him to construct the album’s more experimental tracks ‘Earth Beat’ and ‘Mirror Ball’. The latter, particularly, sounds like a lovely soul ballad falling unexpectedly into the last 10 minutes of 2001: A Space Odyssey.

    “I probably wouldn’t have gone near it when I was younger; I’d have gone, ‘What the fuck is that?’. But as most of my tastes generally have become very opened in the last 20 or 30 years, more and more so there are things that I wouldn’t have understood at one point and now they make complete sense to me. The more music I hear, the more I love, so to me it all starts to become one thing.. Obviously I’m aware of all the genres and styles, but it’s all the same for me.”

    At 62, does he believe it’s still his role to challenge people and change music?

    “Yes I do,” Weller says, “and I think that’s the role of any artist in whatever form.. I always thought that is one of the beautiful sides of it all. So I would like to think that I can still do that but I also do it from the point of view that I really want people to come with it – as opposed to The Style Council when I was just putting everyone’s back up and enjoying it, which is a bit weird. I don’t do it from that standpoint anymore, but I always still follow my own instincts and hope people will like it and come with it.”

    He continues: “Now’s a good time. I’m not getting any younger and I want to try lots of different things, as much as I can possibly incorporate into what I naturally do. It’s feeling that freedom to do that. It feels like where I need to be. I’m trying different things as much as I can – time is of the essence, man.”

    So ‘On Sunset’ suggests. When it isn’t donning a VR headset to glimpse the musical future, it’s pulling on sepia shades to look back at a life properly lived, happy with its lot (“lot of things I’ve never been, I’ve never seen, I don’t care much,” goes idyllic soul haze ‘Village’) and at one with its mortality. “Give the penny to the boatman, see he guides you well,” Weller smirks on the musical hall pastiche ‘Equanimity’. “Whatever he gives you has a price to bear,” he wails amid the future funk of ‘Old Father Tyme’.

    A tricky topic, death, but an unavoidable one, not least because the last time this writer ran into Weller was on a plane into LA on which someone just a few seats from Paul died mid-flight. “On the way back from that trip we saw his son, poor thing,” Paul says, sadly. “Really weird, man.” How you feeling about it yourself these days, Paul?

    “About dying? Haha! I’m just at that age, man. There’s been quite a few people around me have passed away in recent times, my contemporaries and people I went to school with. You can’t help but be conscious of that and all our heroes, the ones that are still around, are either 80 or getting close. You can’t fail but see that you’re next in that long line. But I don’t think in a morbid way, for me I think in a very accepting way, to see that that is part of it – that is the cycle.

    “These days I really try and live in the present and as much as possible take each day as it is and be thankful for it. That’s a sign of getting older I guess but I don’t mind it; I like it. I don’t beat myself up about the past – I should’ve done this or I should never have done that. I try to learn from any mistakes and better myself, but try to live as much as I can in the moment because that’s all there is.”

    The new album features moments of misty eyed reminiscence, most notably the Steely Dan-like ‘Sunset’, which finds Weller wandering the Sunset Strip bars and rock dives he first visited as a 19-year-old new wave ace face with The Jam.

    “We were buzzed to go America,” he says, “because we’d heard so much about it and saw it in the films and music, but we were quite shocked at how dirty and run-down it was in that area. The way people dressed was old-fashioned – we’d just come from the punk London scene and everyone seemed like they were leftovers from Woodstock. People were offering us Quaaludes. It seemed very dated, like a ‘60s hangover thing, so that was a bit disappointing – but the shows were good. I can also remember not being able to get a drink because it was 21, and I’d been drinking since I was 14! That’s my abiding memories of those places.

    “The song comes from when I stayed nearby the Whiskey [a Go Go, the legendary rock club] and that little part of the Strip, and I hadn’t walked round there since that time. I thought, ‘My God – I was 19 when I first hung out here’, and to think that all that time had gone, a whole lifetime.”

    And there’s a fair bit of hard-earned wisdom too. ‘More’ suggests that material possessions and money don’t make you happy – what made him realise that?

    “I’ve always realised that, and at the same time I’ve also seen that poverty doesn’t bring happiness either,” Weller says. “I can remember, as a kid, so many rows between my mum and dad were over money, or lack of. ‘How we gonna pay this bill, how we gonna fuckin’ do this or that’. I’m not one of these idiots who says it’s better to be poor – I don’t believe that either – but there is somewhere in between.

    “It’s really about the post-war mass consumerism, in the West anyway. Super-sizing people until they blow into a complete mess. You’ve only got to go to America to see that, people slowly killing themselves by pizzas and super-sized meal deals. It’s excess. Something like a third of the world’s food goes to waste; it’s just mental. It’s been marketed at us that we need more – that bigger is better – and we clearly don’t.”

    Have you had extravagant periods you’ve regretted? “My only extravagances have been on clothes and records. I’m not a car person and all that bollocks. I was also of the generation that was born into consumerism. When the ‘60s counter-culture was going on I was more of the over-the-counter-culture – I loved clothes and records and I still do.”

    For all his political antipathy, such issues still saunter onto ‘…Sunset’. ‘Walkin’ and the glacial ballroom billow ‘Rockets’ suggest that the power structures manipulating us from the shadows will never change, that the lies remain the same, the wealth stays hidden and “the institution’s old and still in control”. Is that the result of so many years fighting the good fight for so little gain?

    “No, I think the fight’s eternal,” Weller argues. “Whatever way you want to relate to it, big or small, it’s still that eternal good-over-evil or evil-over-good; essentially it all comes down to that. It’s also suggesting that you have to just turn your backs on them, which is not easy because we’re part of that system. I think it’s possible that people will get to that, that people will just think, ‘Listen – we’ve had enough of this’.”

    Weller had been one of Jeremy Corbyn’s more vocal supporters in the music world, playing the first Concert For Corbyn in 2016 as the Labour party leader’s groundswell of support grew. Has a recent leaked Labour report – alleging that members of the party conspired to undermine Corbyn amid the 2017 election and beyond – convinced him Labour isn’t just a non-socialist party but actively anti-socialist?

    “It’s a complete shit-show,” Paul sighs. “A similar thing has gone on now with the whole ‘Protect our NHS’ thing, which they’ve been trying to sell off for the last 40 years. The NHS was built on very, very decent socialist principles after the War, along with education, the welfare society and a lot of things. They were all based on decent socialist principles and people would be well-advised to remember that.”

    Did Corbyn’s treatment by press and party alike hammer home that, like the US, we live in an intrinsically right-wing two-party system? “I’d say it’s been that way for some time. Not as extreme as America but it’s pretty much that way. Getting Tony Blair didn’t make any odds, did it? There was no difference, was there?”

    Politics aside (“thank God…”), Weller’s in a positive place. He’s been using lockdown productively, laying down six tracks for his next album: “I don’t think it’s necessarily got a direction overall but just really good tunes, quite varied… Not songs about the fucking flu, though.”

    Noted fans of The Style Council, Tyler, the Creator

    He’s considering a full album “at some point” of the sort of musique concrète tracks he put together from sounds and conversations he’s been collecting on his phone, and was tickled to hear that Tyler, The Creator recently declared himself a fan of The Style Council.

    “Funnily enough we met him very briefly,” he says, “he’s got a shop on Melrose [Los Angeles]. I’m surprised he’s even heard of us. Would I work with him? I don’t know, mate, but I’m open for working with anyone if they’re good.” You’ve certainly laid the groundwork to get away with a rap record by now. “Yeah – a bit of drill music.”

    He’s tactically ambivalent towards the latest Liam and Noel spats. “I’ve got better things to think about. I love both of them, anyway… I think they’re both brilliant characters.” Liam seemed narked about Noel asking you for advice on going solo before Oasis split. “Listen – to put the record straight, I would never, ever give Noel Gallagher advice,” Weller laughs. “What do you say to somebody who’s just sold 50 million fucking records? ‘Oh, I know what you should do…’ So that’s not true.”

    He’s a man who’s learnt from past battles – just as he hopes humanity will learn from its fight against Covid – that spending free time with family trumps an unnecessary commute and that a better world is possible. For a start, he marvels at how much pollution levels have dropped amid the coronavirus crisis.

    “You can really smell the difference in London,” he says. “Normally it’s thick with black smoke by the end of the day, but I’ve really noticed the change in the air and nature; hearing all the birds singing again and coming back. You see how quickly nature repairs itself in a very short space of time, all the damage we’ve done over decades. There’s lessons to be learned.”

    Down the phone line, you can almost hear him throw up his hands again. “Whether we learn them is another matter, of course.”

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #11146421  | PERMALINK

    herr-rossi
    Moderator
    -

    Registriert seit: 15.05.2005

    Beiträge: 70,743

    @marbeck: Weil das Thema nebenan auch aufkam: Bei Textzitaten bitte immer auch Verfassernamen nennen und einen Link setzen, ich habe das mal ergänzt. „NME“ ist aber zumindest schon mal ein Hinweis und besser als nichts (wie nebenan).

    --

    #11147861  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 21,052

    „On Sunset“ 4 Sterne im NME

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #11149673  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 21,052

    Album: Paul Weller – On Sunset

    Another near-perfect album from the Modfather

    by Mark KidelMonday, 29 June 2020; The Arts Desk

    Weller, ripening with age

    One of the songs on Paul Weller’s excellent new album – only similar to his previous one True Meanings (2018) in that once again he’s gently treading new ground – is called “Equanimity”. The title sums up the quietly joyful and relaxed tone of the material he’s crafted once again with such discernment, musicality and soul.

    The Modfather has settled into a mature groove: one of his new release’s strongest and most appealing qualities is an impeccable attention to production, in tandem with Jan Stan Kybert. Although the sophisticated sounds are steeped in a rich heritage of pop, soul and jazz, the mix feels delightfully fresh. There is a mellotron and a Moog synthesiser, echoes of Sixties experiment, not least the legacy of The Beatles, but reinvented rather than in a nostalgic heritage mode. With subtle cliché-free string support from the Paraorchestra, unobtrusive but atmospheric backing vocals from the sweet-voiced Staves, and perfectly orchestrated horn arrangements (mostly by Steve Triggs), each track – with the exception of the relatively pallid “On Sunset” – is a joy to hear.

    Weller’s voice is versatile, warm and mellow: he treads the path between country and soul – two close cousins – while remaining true to his English roots, and never pretends to be something that he is not. Songs like “Old Father Tyme”, and “Baptiste”, with the Hammond organ and baritone sax so present in Sixties soul, showcase a voice that has ripened with age, and which is totally Weller’s own.

    The lyrics of “Village” reflect this mood of quiet contentment: “I don’t need all the things you got / I just want wanna be who I want”. There is a great deal here about settling for a kind of spiritual surrender, and the bliss of an open heart. “More”, perhaps the album’s stand-out track, with an almost tropical feel, a jazzy flute and a perfectly-crafted arrangement, suggests that less is truly more, and that chasing after future promise robs us of pleasure in the moment. Halfway through this longer track, the song dissolves into an entrancing 3-minute outro, as smooth and sophisticated as the best of Steely Dan, an enticingly danceable moment that characterises an album that is superbly feel-good without ever being soppy or New Age sweet.

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #11152673  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 21,052

    Spiegel online

    Paul Weller – „On Sunset“

    (Polydor/Universal, ab 3. Juli)

    Paul Weller war schon früh ein älterer Herr: Keine 40 Jahre zählte er, als man für ihn Mitte der Neunzigerjahre den Begriff des „Modfathers“ erfand. Ein Ausdruck, der doppelt galt: Zunächst einmal war Weller mit seiner Band The Jam, die er als Teenager gründete, natürlich die zentrale Figur des Mod-Revivals der Siebziger. Aber auch für den sogenannten Britpop spielte er eine große Rolle. Er war Vorbild, Impulsgeber, Strippenzieher – und veröffentlichte 1995 mit „Stanley Road“ ein Album, das rasch seinen Weg in den Genrekanon fand.

    Sein Großwerk bleibt jedoch das zwei Jahre zuvor erschienene „Wild Wood“, auf dem er Impulsen aus der eigenen Vergangenheit (vor allem seiner zweiten Band Style Council) Einflüsse von Northern Soul bis Rock beimengte und das Ganze gemeinsam mit Produzent Brendan Lynch in effektvolle Soundschleifen wickelte.

    Der Eklektizismus, der „Wild Wood“ ausmachte, ist auch das zentrale Wirkprinzip seines inzwischen 15. Solo-Albums „On Sunset“. Allerdings fließen die einzelnen Bestandteile nicht ganz so elegant ineinander. Statt Nahtstellen zu zeigen, mutet Weller uns nun auch Brüche zu. Schon das erste Stück, „Mirror Ball“ zieht den Hörer durch verschiedene Klangdimensionen: Zunächst räsoniert Weller, 62, über die titelgebende Diskokugel, während im Hintergrund ein Klavier, sanfte Percussion und Keyboards Teppichbilder tupfen. Irgendwann klöppelt ein elektronischer Beat, irgendetwas scheint rückwärts zu laufen, die Gitarre twangt. Dann kippt die Melodie, es knarzt und knackt und klappert, und wir sind plötzlich in jener Avantgarde gefangen, die Weller auf seiner im Januar erschienenen „In Another Room“-EP verfolgte.

    Dieser Song ist ein radikaler Bruch zum Vorgängeralbum „True Meanings“, das vor zwei Jahren erschien. Vor allem aber bereitet er den Hörer auf das vor, was folgt. Zehn Stücke lang blickt Weller neugierig in musikalische Welten. Zentral sind dabei drei weitere Stücke: „More“ schichtet Soul und Krautrock übereinander, dazu singt Julie Gros von Wellers französischer Lieblingsband Le Superhomard ein paar französische Worte, bevor Weller wieder drei Minuten lang sein Glück im Jam sucht. „Baptiste“ ist der Gegenpunkt, ein knapp gehaltener, stringenter Soul-Song.

    Inhaltlich sagt „Village“ am meisten über das Album aus: „Here I am, ten stories high. Not a single cloud in my eye“ singt Weller darin. Es ist zu vermuten, dass diese Zeilen nichts mit Rauschmitteln zu tun haben, den Drogen und dem Alkohol hat Weller schon vor einigen Jahren abgeschworen, die gesunde Gesichtsfarbe auf aktuellen Fotos lässt vermuten, dass er viel im Garten arbeitet. Es geht also eher um ein natural high und um die Freude am guten, ruhigen Leben: „Not a thing I’d change if I could. I’m happy here in my neighbourhood“.

    Altersruhe und -Weisheit trifft also auf eine Abenteuerreise durch den Sound. Ersteres führt zu erstaunlich wenig Redundanzen. Auch wenn Weller bisweilen auf Textbausteine wie „Mountains high, valleys low“ zurückgreift, wirkt es eher als Würdigung denn als Phrasenschweinerei. Die Abenteuerlust lässt „On Sunset“ zum besten Weller-Werk seit „22 Dreams“ (2008) werden. Es gelingen ihm sogar einige ebenso anschmiegsame wie kantenreiche Popsongs: Das swingende „Old Father Tyme“, der Beinahe-Boogie „Walkin’“ (das Tenorsaxofon spielt Lee Thompson von Madness) oder „Equanimity“, bei dem Jim Lea von Slade die Fiedel spielt.

    Für Style-Council-Fans vermutlich von allerhöchster Bedeutung: Auf einigen Tracks bedient Mick Talbot die Orgel. Als Ganzes verströmt das Album eine angenehme Zuversicht. Oder, um es noch einmal mit „Village“ zu sagen: „Never knew what a world this was, `til I looked in my heart.“ Harmonie als Strategie, schön. (8.3) Jochen Overbeck

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #11152827  | PERMALINK

    j-w
    Moderator
    maximum rhythm & blues

    Registriert seit: 09.07.2002

    Beiträge: 38,842

    Das wird gut, da bin ich sicher. Den und ich treffen uns am Freitag Abend um bei uns in der Gartenscheuer die LP zu spinnen und zu entdecken. Wenn noch jemand bei uns in Schriesheim vorbei kommen will, ist er/sie herzlich eingeladen, auch eine Übernachtung wäre möglich!

    --

    Staring at a grey sky, try to paint it blue - Teenage Blue
    #11153281  | PERMALINK

    j-w
    Moderator
    maximum rhythm & blues

    Registriert seit: 09.07.2002

    Beiträge: 38,842

    Sie ist da!
    Und ich habe dem Album mal einen eigenen Thread spendiert: http://forum.rollingstone.de/foren/topic/paul-weller-on-sunset/

    --

    Staring at a grey sky, try to paint it blue - Teenage Blue
    #11154073  | PERMALINK

    k-o-r-r

    Registriert seit: 21.07.2016

    Beiträge: 171

    Habe gerade eben das Doppel Picture Vinyl Set bekommen. Optisch gefallen Sie mir sehr gut und ich bin froh, dass ich sie bestellt habe :good:

    Die Tracks höre ich mir gleich digital an und bin schon gespannt.

    --

    #11155433  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 21,052

    In Conversation With Paul Weller | A brand new podcast
    First episode 6pm Monday 6th July
    Subscribe & listen: https://paulweller.lnk.to/PodcastEM

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #11155435  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 21,052

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #11155677  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 21,052

    Tonight at 5pm BST over on Paul’s YouTube ‚On Sunset: The Making Of‘ will be premiered! There will be a live chat where you can join other fans. Head to the link below to set a reminder and watch.

    https://zaphod.vvhp.net/v-v/lQ8EZsoX349258-5609689

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #11157835  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 21,052

    marbeck<iframe src=“https://www.youtube.com/embed/A51XdBQ_qbk?start=5&feature=oembed“ allow=“accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture“ allowfullscreen=““ width=“500″ height=“281″ frameborder=“0″></iframe>
    In Conversation With Paul Weller | A brand new podcast
    First episode 6pm Monday 6th July
    Subscribe & listen: https://paulweller.lnk.to/PodcastEM

    Erster von drei Teilen

    https://play.acast.com/s/in-conversation-with-paul-weller/paulwellerinconversation-episode1-featuringdylanjones

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
    #11157837  | PERMALINK

    marbeck
    Keine Lust, mir etwas auszudenken

    Registriert seit: 27.07.2004

    Beiträge: 21,052

    Interview auf Absolute Radio

    --

    "I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered." - George Best --- Dienstags und donnerstags, ab 20 Uhr, samstags ab 20.30 Uhr: Radio StoneFM
Ansicht von 15 Beiträgen - 15,121 bis 15,135 (von insgesamt 15,136)

Du musst angemeldet sein, um auf dieses Thema antworten zu können.